Resource needs and the dynamic capitalism typology

Resource needs and the dynamic capitalism typology ELSEVIER EXECUTIVE FORUM PATRICIA GENE GREENE Rutgers University TERRENCE EDISON BROWN Jonkoping University INTRODUCTION The study of entrepreneurship, while being concerned with both opportunities and resources, is more systematic in the discussion of opportunities than in the treatment of resources. Kirchhoff's (1994) new dynamic capitalism typology, which is rooted in Schumpeterian theory, may help us to better understand the importance of various types of resources to businesses theoretically classified by their rates of growth and rates of innovation. Frameworks such as this one have the potential to serve as a benchmark for the practitioner, as well as a guide for policy-makers with regard to the varying nature of resource needs by different types of businesses. In addition, discussions organized around this typology also contribute to theoretical development regarding entrepreneurial processes of resource identification, acquisition, and combination, especially as relevant for businesses and owners defined by varying characteristics. By defining entrepreneurship as "small firms that successfully, creatively destroy existing markets" (Kirchhoff 1994, p. 60), we join others in recognizing that entrepreneurship is not a dichotomous condition, but instead represents a continuum of being more or less entrepreneurial (Stevenson and Gumpert 1985). Distinctions between entrepreneurship and small business have been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Business Venturing Elsevier

Resource needs and the dynamic capitalism typology

Journal of Business Venturing, Volume 12 (3) – May 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0883-9026
DOI
10.1016/S0883-9026(96)00060-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ELSEVIER EXECUTIVE FORUM PATRICIA GENE GREENE Rutgers University TERRENCE EDISON BROWN Jonkoping University INTRODUCTION The study of entrepreneurship, while being concerned with both opportunities and resources, is more systematic in the discussion of opportunities than in the treatment of resources. Kirchhoff's (1994) new dynamic capitalism typology, which is rooted in Schumpeterian theory, may help us to better understand the importance of various types of resources to businesses theoretically classified by their rates of growth and rates of innovation. Frameworks such as this one have the potential to serve as a benchmark for the practitioner, as well as a guide for policy-makers with regard to the varying nature of resource needs by different types of businesses. In addition, discussions organized around this typology also contribute to theoretical development regarding entrepreneurial processes of resource identification, acquisition, and combination, especially as relevant for businesses and owners defined by varying characteristics. By defining entrepreneurship as "small firms that successfully, creatively destroy existing markets" (Kirchhoff 1994, p. 60), we join others in recognizing that entrepreneurship is not a dichotomous condition, but instead represents a continuum of being more or less entrepreneurial (Stevenson and Gumpert 1985). Distinctions between entrepreneurship and small business have been

Journal

Journal of Business VenturingElsevier

Published: May 1, 1997

References

  • Towanda's triumph: Social and cultural capital in the transition to adulthood in the urban ghetto
    Kelly, M.P.F.

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