Resistant starch formation in bread as influenced by choice of ingredients or baking conditions

Resistant starch formation in bread as influenced by choice of ingredients or baking conditions The formation of resistant starch (RS) in bread products was evaluated in vitro in relation to the processing conditions. The impact of the particular baking conditions applied to pumpernickel bread was investigated as well as the presence of malt and sourdough acids, commonly present in such bread. Also studied was the potential effect of including wholemeal barley from a high-amylose genotype. In some bread, the rate of hydrolysis of the potentially available starch fraction was evaluated by an in vitro procedure. A low-temperature, long-time baked product (20 h at 120 °C) contained significantly higher amounts of RS (5.4%, starch basis) than a corresponding ordinary baked bread (40min at 200 °C) (3.0%, starch basis). Addition of lactic acid increased RS recovery further (6.6% starch basis), whereas malt had no impact on RS yield. The highest level of RS was noted in a long-time baked bread based on high-amylose barley flour (7.7%, starch basis). In contrast to all other products, this bread also displayed a lowered rate of amylolysis of the non-RS fraction (hydrolysis rate index = 68). It is concluded that exchanging ordinary baking conditions for pumpernickel baking, particularly in the presence of certain organic acids, may substantially increase the RS content. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Chemistry Elsevier

Resistant starch formation in bread as influenced by choice of ingredients or baking conditions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/resistant-starch-formation-in-bread-as-influenced-by-choice-of-dh7s5Nhos9
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0308-8146
D.O.I.
10.1016/0308-8146(95)00199-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The formation of resistant starch (RS) in bread products was evaluated in vitro in relation to the processing conditions. The impact of the particular baking conditions applied to pumpernickel bread was investigated as well as the presence of malt and sourdough acids, commonly present in such bread. Also studied was the potential effect of including wholemeal barley from a high-amylose genotype. In some bread, the rate of hydrolysis of the potentially available starch fraction was evaluated by an in vitro procedure. A low-temperature, long-time baked product (20 h at 120 °C) contained significantly higher amounts of RS (5.4%, starch basis) than a corresponding ordinary baked bread (40min at 200 °C) (3.0%, starch basis). Addition of lactic acid increased RS recovery further (6.6% starch basis), whereas malt had no impact on RS yield. The highest level of RS was noted in a long-time baked bread based on high-amylose barley flour (7.7%, starch basis). In contrast to all other products, this bread also displayed a lowered rate of amylolysis of the non-RS fraction (hydrolysis rate index = 68). It is concluded that exchanging ordinary baking conditions for pumpernickel baking, particularly in the presence of certain organic acids, may substantially increase the RS content.

Journal

Food ChemistryElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 1996

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off