Resistance to particle abrasion of selected plastics

Resistance to particle abrasion of selected plastics Accelerated abrasive wear of plastic parts in a piece of production machinery prompted a laboratory study to find a material with better abrasion resistance. The abrasion occurred in a machine that compacted ‘sand-like’ particles of an inorganic compound. The abrasion resistance of a wide variety of plastics and different durometer polyurethanes (21 materials) was tested with a modification of the ASTM dry-sand rubber wheel three-body abrasion test. Only one material, a polyurethane, had better abrasion resistance than the material that was currently in use. Hardness, friction and scratch tests were conducted on the test materials to try to understand the role of material properties in this type of abrasion. None of these correlated with the wear data. Previous investigators of plastic abrasion related abrasion resistance to the fracture energy and friction. The wear data developed in this study did not correlate with the specific model proposed by Ratner. However, it was possible to obtain a reasonable correlation with a deformation factor that included the friction of the abrasive on the plastic and a term that related to the energy required to deform the material plastically. A test similar to a Brinell hardness test was used to arrive at the deformation energy of the 21 test materials. The more easily the material deforms in contact with a particular abrasive, the better the abrasion resistance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Resistance to particle abrasion of selected plastics

Wear, Volume 203 – Mar 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/resistance-to-particle-abrasion-of-selected-plastics-jrrCBcZZir
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0043-1648(96)07346-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Accelerated abrasive wear of plastic parts in a piece of production machinery prompted a laboratory study to find a material with better abrasion resistance. The abrasion occurred in a machine that compacted ‘sand-like’ particles of an inorganic compound. The abrasion resistance of a wide variety of plastics and different durometer polyurethanes (21 materials) was tested with a modification of the ASTM dry-sand rubber wheel three-body abrasion test. Only one material, a polyurethane, had better abrasion resistance than the material that was currently in use. Hardness, friction and scratch tests were conducted on the test materials to try to understand the role of material properties in this type of abrasion. None of these correlated with the wear data. Previous investigators of plastic abrasion related abrasion resistance to the fracture energy and friction. The wear data developed in this study did not correlate with the specific model proposed by Ratner. However, it was possible to obtain a reasonable correlation with a deformation factor that included the friction of the abrasive on the plastic and a term that related to the energy required to deform the material plastically. A test similar to a Brinell hardness test was used to arrive at the deformation energy of the 21 test materials. The more easily the material deforms in contact with a particular abrasive, the better the abrasion resistance.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 1997

References

  • Tribology
    Hutchings, I.M.
  • Development of an equation for the wear of polymers
    Viswanath, N.; Bellow, D.G.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off