Resistance of double-layer reinforced HPC barriers to projectile impact

Resistance of double-layer reinforced HPC barriers to projectile impact 1 Introduction</h5> Reinforced concrete (RC) is commonly used in structural elements that are designated to act as barriers that are required to withstand impact, whether they be civilian structures (e.g., rock sheds) or defence structures (e.g. shelters). Such structures may be subjected to impact by projectiles that result in local response characterized by penetration and local damage. Damage to the front (impacted) side of the barrier includes the formation of a crater, cracking, and penetration. Rear (inner, protected) side damage includes perforation by the striking projectile with residual velocity and cratering associated with the formation of a shear plug. Rear face scabbing may, however, develop even when the barrier is not perforated (e.g. [17] ). Thus, the parameters that characterize the resistance of an RC barrier and its performance under impact load are the perforation limit, the penetration depth, and the amount of damage that develops at the front and rear faces.</P>Until about two decades ago, concrete resistance to impact was represented by the concrete's compressive strength, f c , where the resistance is inversely proportional to f c raised to a power of about 0.5 (e.g. [11–15] ). Thus, the increased strength of High Strength Concrete (HSC) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Impact Engineering Elsevier

Resistance of double-layer reinforced HPC barriers to projectile impact

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0734-743X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ijimpeng.2014.01.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Reinforced concrete (RC) is commonly used in structural elements that are designated to act as barriers that are required to withstand impact, whether they be civilian structures (e.g., rock sheds) or defence structures (e.g. shelters). Such structures may be subjected to impact by projectiles that result in local response characterized by penetration and local damage. Damage to the front (impacted) side of the barrier includes the formation of a crater, cracking, and penetration. Rear (inner, protected) side damage includes perforation by the striking projectile with residual velocity and cratering associated with the formation of a shear plug. Rear face scabbing may, however, develop even when the barrier is not perforated (e.g. [17] ). Thus, the parameters that characterize the resistance of an RC barrier and its performance under impact load are the perforation limit, the penetration depth, and the amount of damage that develops at the front and rear faces.</P>Until about two decades ago, concrete resistance to impact was represented by the concrete's compressive strength, f c , where the resistance is inversely proportional to f c raised to a power of about 0.5 (e.g. [11–15] ). Thus, the increased strength of High Strength Concrete (HSC)

Journal

International Journal of Impact EngineeringElsevier

Published: May 1, 2014

References

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