Research note: Greater tree canopy cover is associated with lower rates of both violent and property crime in New Haven, CT

Research note: Greater tree canopy cover is associated with lower rates of both violent and... 1 Introduction</h5> Crime, particularly violent crime, is a major concern for many cities in the United States and worldwide ( United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, 2005 ). Solutions to the problem of urban crime require a multi-faceted approach. Evolving literature suggests that potentially modifiable neighborhood characteristics such as trees and other vegetation are inversely associated with crime, so urban greening could be a relatively low-cost component of the solution. The traditional law enforcement view was that dense vegetation encouraged crime by obstructing surveillance and providing concealment for criminal activity ( Jeffery, 1971; Michael & Hull, 1994; Michael, Hull, & Zahm, 2001 ; Newman, 1978 ). This view was reinforced by studies that linked dense vegetation with crime and fear of crime ( Fisher & Nasar, 1992; Nasar & Fisher, 1993; Shaffer & Anderson, 1985 ). The prevailing message from these studies was that removal of vegetation could aid in crime reduction efforts, despite the fact that none of these studies measured crime occurrence.</P>However, more recent studies using crime data from police reports and other sources have found a negative relationship between vegetation and crime. A 2001 study of a public housing development in Chicago was first to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Landscape and Urban Planning Elsevier

Research note: Greater tree canopy cover is associated with lower rates of both violent and property crime in New Haven, CT

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Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Crime, particularly violent crime, is a major concern for many cities in the United States and worldwide ( United Nations Centre for Human Settlements, 2005 ). Solutions to the problem of urban crime require a multi-faceted approach. Evolving literature suggests that potentially modifiable neighborhood characteristics such as trees and other vegetation are inversely associated with crime, so urban greening could be a relatively low-cost component of the solution. The traditional law enforcement view was that dense vegetation encouraged crime by obstructing surveillance and providing concealment for criminal activity ( Jeffery, 1971; Michael & Hull, 1994; Michael, Hull, & Zahm, 2001 ; Newman, 1978 ). This view was reinforced by studies that linked dense vegetation with crime and fear of crime ( Fisher & Nasar, 1992; Nasar & Fisher, 1993; Shaffer & Anderson, 1985 ). The prevailing message from these studies was that removal of vegetation could aid in crime reduction efforts, despite the fact that none of these studies measured crime occurrence.</P>However, more recent studies using crime data from police reports and other sources have found a negative relationship between vegetation and crime. A 2001 study of a public housing development in Chicago was first to

Journal

Landscape and Urban PlanningElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2015

References

  • Crime: Social disorganization and relative deprivation
    Kawachi, I.; Kennedy, B.P.; Wilkinson, R.G.
  • The relationship between tree canopy and crime rates across an urban–rural gradient in the greater Baltimore region
    Troy, A.; Morgan Grove, J.; O’Neil-Dunne, J.
  • Does vegetation encourage or suppress urban crime?. Evidence from Philadelphia, PA
    Wolfe, M.K.; Mennis, J.

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