Repopulation of injured brain with human adipo-derived stem cells after traumatic brain injury

Repopulation of injured brain with human adipo-derived stem cells after traumatic brain injury <h5>Introduction</h5> An emerging approach for the treatment of traumatic brain injury is the use of stem cells for cell replacement therapy. Clinical implementation of such therapies, however, is hampered by technical, ethical, and political issues. Recently, we have demonstrated the existence of a novel, exciting source of multipotent cells in adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue that overcome these issues. We investigated the potential of human adipo-derived stem cell (hADC) implantation in traumatic brain injury.</P><h5>Methods</h5> Adult male rats underwent lateral fluid percussion brain injury, which produces a cortical contusion and hippocampal cell death. Simultaneously, hADCs were prepared from fat harvested during elective liposuction surgeries and then implanted stereotactically into parietal subcortical white matter at 7d postinjury. Animals survived 6 weeks after cell injection and brain tissue processed for dual-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry of CNS cell-type markers.</P><h5>Results</h5> In posttraumatic rat brain, hADCs migrated along subcortical white matter tracts and repopulated the cortical contusion penumbra and hippocampal CA1 region. hADCs engrafted and differentiated along neuronal cell lines.</P><h5>Conclusions</h5> Human adipo-derived stem cells repopulate sites of injury in the posttraumatic rat brain and differentiate into neuronal phenotypes. Because these cells are obtained from fat, a tissue source abundant in most adults, hADCs represent a major potential autologous source for cell replacement therapy. With successful development, the strategy would be to harvest adipose tissue from the patient’s abdomen early after injury, cultivate the cells in the laboratory into multipotent cells, and reimplant them into the patient’s own brain to stimulate recovery of neurologic functioning.</P> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the American College of Surgeons Elsevier

Repopulation of injured brain with human adipo-derived stem cells after traumatic brain injury

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American College of Surgeons
ISSN
1072-7515
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2005.06.101
Publisher site
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Abstract

<h5>Introduction</h5> An emerging approach for the treatment of traumatic brain injury is the use of stem cells for cell replacement therapy. Clinical implementation of such therapies, however, is hampered by technical, ethical, and political issues. Recently, we have demonstrated the existence of a novel, exciting source of multipotent cells in adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue that overcome these issues. We investigated the potential of human adipo-derived stem cell (hADC) implantation in traumatic brain injury.</P><h5>Methods</h5> Adult male rats underwent lateral fluid percussion brain injury, which produces a cortical contusion and hippocampal cell death. Simultaneously, hADCs were prepared from fat harvested during elective liposuction surgeries and then implanted stereotactically into parietal subcortical white matter at 7d postinjury. Animals survived 6 weeks after cell injection and brain tissue processed for dual-label fluorescent immunohistochemistry of CNS cell-type markers.</P><h5>Results</h5> In posttraumatic rat brain, hADCs migrated along subcortical white matter tracts and repopulated the cortical contusion penumbra and hippocampal CA1 region. hADCs engrafted and differentiated along neuronal cell lines.</P><h5>Conclusions</h5> Human adipo-derived stem cells repopulate sites of injury in the posttraumatic rat brain and differentiate into neuronal phenotypes. Because these cells are obtained from fat, a tissue source abundant in most adults, hADCs represent a major potential autologous source for cell replacement therapy. With successful development, the strategy would be to harvest adipose tissue from the patient’s abdomen early after injury, cultivate the cells in the laboratory into multipotent cells, and reimplant them into the patient’s own brain to stimulate recovery of neurologic functioning.</P>

Journal

Journal of the American College of SurgeonsElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2005

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