Release of yerba mate antioxidants from corn starch–alginate capsules as affected by structure

Release of yerba mate antioxidants from corn starch–alginate capsules as affected by structure 1 Introduction</h5> Yerba mate is listed as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) and constitutes a promising alternative for low-cost natural antioxidants to extend shelf-life of foods or act as a functional additive. Moreover, these extracts become an actual choice of synthetic additives since the latest alternatives have been associated with the current generation of adverse health effects ( Moure et al., 2001 ). However, this substitution is still under study because natural antioxidants have limited stability under environmental conditions and some of them have an unpleasant flavor ( Kosaraju, Labbett, Emin, Konczak, & Lundin, 2008 ).</P>The polyphenols are abundant compounds in yerba mate extract and some of its pharmacological properties have been related mainly to the high content of chlorogenic acid and its derivatives ( Jaiswal, Sovdat, Vivan, & Kuhnert, 2010; Marques & Farah, 2009 ). Recent studies have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities, and hepatoprotective, choleretic, diuretic, hypocholesterolemic, antirheumatic, antitrombotic, antiinflammatory, antiobesity or antiageing properties ( Bracesco, Sanchez, Contreras, Menini, & Gugliucci, 2011; Dugo et al., 2009 ). In addition, research literature provides examples of yerba mate extracts used as ingredients to prevent deterioration of meats and meat products ( De Campos et al., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Carbohydrate Polymers Elsevier

Release of yerba mate antioxidants from corn starch–alginate capsules as affected by structure

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0144-8617
DOI
10.1016/j.carbpol.2013.08.026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Yerba mate is listed as GRAS (generally recognized as safe) and constitutes a promising alternative for low-cost natural antioxidants to extend shelf-life of foods or act as a functional additive. Moreover, these extracts become an actual choice of synthetic additives since the latest alternatives have been associated with the current generation of adverse health effects ( Moure et al., 2001 ). However, this substitution is still under study because natural antioxidants have limited stability under environmental conditions and some of them have an unpleasant flavor ( Kosaraju, Labbett, Emin, Konczak, & Lundin, 2008 ).</P>The polyphenols are abundant compounds in yerba mate extract and some of its pharmacological properties have been related mainly to the high content of chlorogenic acid and its derivatives ( Jaiswal, Sovdat, Vivan, & Kuhnert, 2010; Marques & Farah, 2009 ). Recent studies have demonstrated in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities, and hepatoprotective, choleretic, diuretic, hypocholesterolemic, antirheumatic, antitrombotic, antiinflammatory, antiobesity or antiageing properties ( Bracesco, Sanchez, Contreras, Menini, & Gugliucci, 2011; Dugo et al., 2009 ). In addition, research literature provides examples of yerba mate extracts used as ingredients to prevent deterioration of meats and meat products ( De Campos et al.,

Journal

Carbohydrate PolymersElsevier

Published: Jan 2, 2014

References

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