Relationship between bisphenol A exposure and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: A case-control study for primary school children in Guangzhou, China

Relationship between bisphenol A exposure and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: A... Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Studies have shown that the exposure to BPA is associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during adolescent development. However the direct clinical evidence is limited. To investigate the possible association between environmental BPA exposure and the altered behavior of children, a case-control study was conducted with children aged 6–12 years in Guangzhou, China. Two hundred fifteen children diagnosed with ADHD and 253 healthy children from Guangzhou were recruited as the case and control groups, respectively. Urinary BPA and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage) concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem spectrometry. The results showed that concentrations of urinary BPA for the case group were significantly higher than those for the control group (3.44 vs 1.70 μg/L; 4.63 vs 1.71 μg/g Crt. p < .001). A stepwise increase in the odds ratios for ADHD was observed with the increasing quartiles of children's urinary BPA (first quartile: reference category; second quartile adjusted OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 0.95–3.37; third quartile adjusted OR: 7.44, 95% CI: 3.91–14.1; fourth quartile adjusted OR: 9.41, 95% CI: 4.91–18.1). When the BPA levels were stratified by gender, the odds of ADHD among boys and girls increased significantly with urinary BPA concentrations (adjusted OR: 4.58, 95% CI: 2.84–7.37; adjusted OR: 2.83, 95% CI: 1.17–6.84). Urinary 8-OHdG concentrations in the ADHD children were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, the linear regression analysis results indicated that a significant relationship existed between BPA exposure and 8-OHdG levels (R = 0.257, p < .001). Our findings provide direct evidence that childhood BPA exposure may be related to ADHD and 8-OHdG concentrations for children. Moreover, BPA exposure could increase the higher occurrence of ADHD for boy than for girls. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Relationship between bisphenol A exposure and attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder: A case-control study for primary school children in Guangzhou, China

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.056
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Studies have shown that the exposure to BPA is associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) during adolescent development. However the direct clinical evidence is limited. To investigate the possible association between environmental BPA exposure and the altered behavior of children, a case-control study was conducted with children aged 6–12 years in Guangzhou, China. Two hundred fifteen children diagnosed with ADHD and 253 healthy children from Guangzhou were recruited as the case and control groups, respectively. Urinary BPA and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG, a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage) concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/tandem spectrometry. The results showed that concentrations of urinary BPA for the case group were significantly higher than those for the control group (3.44 vs 1.70 μg/L; 4.63 vs 1.71 μg/g Crt. p < .001). A stepwise increase in the odds ratios for ADHD was observed with the increasing quartiles of children's urinary BPA (first quartile: reference category; second quartile adjusted OR: 1.79, 95% CI: 0.95–3.37; third quartile adjusted OR: 7.44, 95% CI: 3.91–14.1; fourth quartile adjusted OR: 9.41, 95% CI: 4.91–18.1). When the BPA levels were stratified by gender, the odds of ADHD among boys and girls increased significantly with urinary BPA concentrations (adjusted OR: 4.58, 95% CI: 2.84–7.37; adjusted OR: 2.83, 95% CI: 1.17–6.84). Urinary 8-OHdG concentrations in the ADHD children were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, the linear regression analysis results indicated that a significant relationship existed between BPA exposure and 8-OHdG levels (R = 0.257, p < .001). Our findings provide direct evidence that childhood BPA exposure may be related to ADHD and 8-OHdG concentrations for children. Moreover, BPA exposure could increase the higher occurrence of ADHD for boy than for girls.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2018

References

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