Relation of Coronary Culprit Lesion Morphology Determined by Optical Coherence Tomography and Cardiac Outcomes to Serum Uric Acid Levels in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

Relation of Coronary Culprit Lesion Morphology Determined by Optical Coherence Tomography and... The aims of the present study were to elucidate features of culprit lesion plaque morphology using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in relation to elevated serum uric acid (sUA) levels and to clarify the impact of sUA levels on adverse clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Clinical data and outcomes were compared between ACS patients with sUA ≥6 mg/dl (high-sUA; n = 506) and sUA <6.0 mg/dl (low-sUA; n = 608). Angiography and OCT findings were analyzed in patients with preintervention OCT and compared between groups of high-sUA (n = 206) and low-sUA (n = 273). Patients with high-sUA were more frequently male (88% vs 74%, p <0.001), younger (median 65 years vs 67 years, p = 0.017), more obese (median body mass index; 24.3 kg/m2 vs 23.2 kg/m2, p <0.001), and had a more frequent history of hypertension (72% vs 62%, p <0.001). ACS with lung congestion or cardiogenic shock was more prevalent in patients with high-sUA (30% vs 13%, p <0.001). Plaque rupture (54% vs 42%, p = 0.021) and red thrombi (55% vs 41%, p = 0.010) were more prevalently observed by OCT in patients with high-sUA. Kaplan–Meier estimate survival curves showed that the 2-year cardiac mortality was higher in patients with high-sUA (12.1% vs 4.2%, p <0.001). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that sUA values independently and significantly predicted cardiac death within 2 years (hazard ratio 1.41 [95% confidence interval 1.26 to 1.57], p <0.001). In conclusion, sUA levels are associated with culprit lesion coronary plaque morphology and raised sUA levels affect cardiovascular mortality after adjusting for several cardiovascular risk factors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The American Journal of Cardiology Elsevier

Relation of Coronary Culprit Lesion Morphology Determined by Optical Coherence Tomography and Cardiac Outcomes to Serum Uric Acid Levels in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/relation-of-coronary-culprit-lesion-morphology-determined-by-optical-lNdDYc96iO
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0002-9149
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.amjcard.2018.03.022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The aims of the present study were to elucidate features of culprit lesion plaque morphology using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in relation to elevated serum uric acid (sUA) levels and to clarify the impact of sUA levels on adverse clinical outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Clinical data and outcomes were compared between ACS patients with sUA ≥6 mg/dl (high-sUA; n = 506) and sUA <6.0 mg/dl (low-sUA; n = 608). Angiography and OCT findings were analyzed in patients with preintervention OCT and compared between groups of high-sUA (n = 206) and low-sUA (n = 273). Patients with high-sUA were more frequently male (88% vs 74%, p <0.001), younger (median 65 years vs 67 years, p = 0.017), more obese (median body mass index; 24.3 kg/m2 vs 23.2 kg/m2, p <0.001), and had a more frequent history of hypertension (72% vs 62%, p <0.001). ACS with lung congestion or cardiogenic shock was more prevalent in patients with high-sUA (30% vs 13%, p <0.001). Plaque rupture (54% vs 42%, p = 0.021) and red thrombi (55% vs 41%, p = 0.010) were more prevalently observed by OCT in patients with high-sUA. Kaplan–Meier estimate survival curves showed that the 2-year cardiac mortality was higher in patients with high-sUA (12.1% vs 4.2%, p <0.001). The multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis showed that sUA values independently and significantly predicted cardiac death within 2 years (hazard ratio 1.41 [95% confidence interval 1.26 to 1.57], p <0.001). In conclusion, sUA levels are associated with culprit lesion coronary plaque morphology and raised sUA levels affect cardiovascular mortality after adjusting for several cardiovascular risk factors.

Journal

The American Journal of CardiologyElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off