Regional habitat conservation priorities for the American crocodile

Regional habitat conservation priorities for the American crocodile The American crocodile is widely distributed in coastal and lowland wetlands in the northern Neotropics. As a result of commercial skin hunting in the 20th century, populations were greatly diminished, but in many areas have initiated a period of recovery since hunting and trade controls were enacted in the 1980s and 1990s. While a great deal of attention has been devoted to regulated commercial use as a management strategy for recovering crocodilian populations, these approaches are limited in their efficacy to deal with issues of habitat loss and fragmentation. Because habitat limitations are expected to be the most critical issue for crocodile conservation in the 21st century, there is an unfulfilled need for alternative strategies that prioritize habitat conservation. Here, we present results of an international effort to identify and prioritize the most critical habitats for this wide ranging species. We quantified information of a group of American crocodile experts and classified 69 areas in eight distinct crocodile bioregions as Crocodile Conservation Units (CCU), the most important areas for the conservation of this species. The relative importance of the CCUs in each bioregion was quantified using an algorithm that weighted factors that the experts considered to be most important for the long term conservation of viable populations of crocodiles. This effort is the initial step in the development of a regional conservation plan for the American crocodile. We identified two bioregions in particular where the creation of protected areas should be given a high priority, the Dry Pacific South America (northern Peru and southern Ecuador) and the Northwest and Central Pacific Mexico. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biological Conservation Elsevier

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/regional-habitat-conservation-priorities-for-the-american-crocodile-v805v8cN37
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0006-3207
DOI
10.1016/j.biocon.2005.09.013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The American crocodile is widely distributed in coastal and lowland wetlands in the northern Neotropics. As a result of commercial skin hunting in the 20th century, populations were greatly diminished, but in many areas have initiated a period of recovery since hunting and trade controls were enacted in the 1980s and 1990s. While a great deal of attention has been devoted to regulated commercial use as a management strategy for recovering crocodilian populations, these approaches are limited in their efficacy to deal with issues of habitat loss and fragmentation. Because habitat limitations are expected to be the most critical issue for crocodile conservation in the 21st century, there is an unfulfilled need for alternative strategies that prioritize habitat conservation. Here, we present results of an international effort to identify and prioritize the most critical habitats for this wide ranging species. We quantified information of a group of American crocodile experts and classified 69 areas in eight distinct crocodile bioregions as Crocodile Conservation Units (CCU), the most important areas for the conservation of this species. The relative importance of the CCUs in each bioregion was quantified using an algorithm that weighted factors that the experts considered to be most important for the long term conservation of viable populations of crocodiles. This effort is the initial step in the development of a regional conservation plan for the American crocodile. We identified two bioregions in particular where the creation of protected areas should be given a high priority, the Dry Pacific South America (northern Peru and southern Ecuador) and the Northwest and Central Pacific Mexico.

Journal

Biological ConservationElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2006

References

  • Planning to save a species, the jaguar as a model
    Sanderson, E.; Redford, K.H.; Chetkiewicz, C-L.B.; Medellin, R.A.; Rabinowitz, A.R.; Robinson, J.G.; Taber, A.B.
  • Crocodile tears and skins, international trade, economic constraints, and limits to the sustainable use of crocodilians
    Thorbjarnarson, J.
  • Economic incentives for management of Venezuelan caiman
    Thorbjarnarson, J.; Velasco, A.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off