Reductive Dehalogenases Come of Age in Biological Destruction of Organohalides

Reductive Dehalogenases Come of Age in Biological Destruction of Organohalides Halogenated organic compounds (organohalides) are globally prevalent, recalcitrant toxic, and carcinogenic environmental pollutants. Select microorganisms encode enzymes known as reductive dehalogenases (EC 1.97.1.8) that catalyze reductive dehalogenation reactions resulting in the generation of lesser-halogenated compounds that may be less toxic and more biodegradable. Recent breakthroughs in enzyme structure determination, elucidation of the mechanisms of reductive dehalogenation, and in heterologous expression of functional reductive dehalogenase enzymes have substantially increased our understanding of this fascinating class of enzymes. This knowledge has created opportunities for more versatile (in situ and ex situ) biologically-mediated organohalide destruction strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Trends in Biotechnology Elsevier

Reductive Dehalogenases Come of Age in Biological Destruction of Organohalides

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Publisher
Elsevier Current Trends
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0167-7799
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.tibtech.2015.07.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Halogenated organic compounds (organohalides) are globally prevalent, recalcitrant toxic, and carcinogenic environmental pollutants. Select microorganisms encode enzymes known as reductive dehalogenases (EC 1.97.1.8) that catalyze reductive dehalogenation reactions resulting in the generation of lesser-halogenated compounds that may be less toxic and more biodegradable. Recent breakthroughs in enzyme structure determination, elucidation of the mechanisms of reductive dehalogenation, and in heterologous expression of functional reductive dehalogenase enzymes have substantially increased our understanding of this fascinating class of enzymes. This knowledge has created opportunities for more versatile (in situ and ex situ) biologically-mediated organohalide destruction strategies.

Journal

Trends in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2015

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