Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy: Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial

Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy: Design of... Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation.Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Clinical Trials Elsevier

Reducing racial/ethnic tobacco cessation disparities via cognitive behavioral therapy: Design of a dualsite randomized controlled trial

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/reducing-racial-ethnic-tobacco-cessation-disparities-via-cognitive-M0uLm4KuSM
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1551-7144
eISSN
1559-2030
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cct.2018.03.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Racial/ethnic disparities in tobacco cessation are such that U.S. minorities have greater difficulty quitting compared to White non-Hispanics. Group differences in distress (i.e., perceived stress and depressive symptoms) may contribute to cessation disparities. The allostasis model of health suggests that the toll of chronic stress experienced by racial/ethnic minorities may lead to dysregulation of the physiological stress system and drug use. Previous research suggests that group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for tobacco cessation addresses distress as a modifiable mechanism and has the potential to reduce/eliminate disparities. The present study is a dualsite randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of group CBT in eliminating racial/ethnic differences in smoking cessation and distress. The study utilizes a [2 (intervention: group CBT or group general health education [GHE]) × 3 (race/ethnicity: African American/Black, Hispanic, White)] factorial design by randomizing 225 adult smokers from the community. Both interventions provide eight counseling sessions and eight weeks of nicotine patch therapy. Assessments occur at the end-of-therapy, and at 3-, 6-, and 12-months. Generalized longitudinal mixed modeling will be used to test our primary abstinence outcome, biochemically-confirmed 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 12-months. We hypothesize that group CBT will reduce or eliminate racial/ethnic differences in perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and smoking cessation compared to group GHE. We also hypothesize that reductions in physiological distress, assessed by salivary cortisol, will mediate racial/ethnic group differences in smoking cessation, particularly among racial/ethnic minorities. This study has implications for eliminating disparities in psychosocial factors related to tobacco use and cessation.Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.govNCT02511236. Registered on July 27, 2015.

Journal

Contemporary Clinical TrialsElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off