Reducing meat consumption: Identifying group-specific inhibitors using latent profile analysis

Reducing meat consumption: Identifying group-specific inhibitors using latent profile analysis Consumption of animal products is an important greenhouse gas emitting behavior. However, perceived hindrances to incorporating more plant-based diets present challenges for the successful design of behavior-change interventions. Latent profile analysis of survey responses revealed three distinct groups. Meat-reducers perceive the fewest inhibitors and are the most willing to incorporate more meat-free days in their diets. Moderate-hindrance meat eaters perceive many more inhibitors, and are hindered by a lack of social support, attachment to meat, not wanting to change their routine, and less awareness of the health benefits of eating less meat. They are willing to incorporate new healthy foods in their diet and are somewhat willing to avoid meat on some days. Strong-hindrance meat eaters report weak self-efficacy and the most inhibitors but are somewhat willing to incorporate healthier foods in their diets. Implications for tailored meat-reduction interventions are discussed. For example, when targeting meat-attached individuals, it might be beneficial to focus on replacing red meats with less carbon-intensive protein sources. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Appetite Elsevier

Reducing meat consumption: Identifying group-specific inhibitors using latent profile analysis

Appetite, Volume 138 – Jul 1, 2019

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0195-6663
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.appet.2019.04.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Consumption of animal products is an important greenhouse gas emitting behavior. However, perceived hindrances to incorporating more plant-based diets present challenges for the successful design of behavior-change interventions. Latent profile analysis of survey responses revealed three distinct groups. Meat-reducers perceive the fewest inhibitors and are the most willing to incorporate more meat-free days in their diets. Moderate-hindrance meat eaters perceive many more inhibitors, and are hindered by a lack of social support, attachment to meat, not wanting to change their routine, and less awareness of the health benefits of eating less meat. They are willing to incorporate new healthy foods in their diet and are somewhat willing to avoid meat on some days. Strong-hindrance meat eaters report weak self-efficacy and the most inhibitors but are somewhat willing to incorporate healthier foods in their diets. Implications for tailored meat-reduction interventions are discussed. For example, when targeting meat-attached individuals, it might be beneficial to focus on replacing red meats with less carbon-intensive protein sources.

Journal

AppetiteElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2019

References

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