REDD-plus, forest people's rights and nested climate governance

REDD-plus, forest people's rights and nested climate governance At Copenhagen, the Ad Hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA) was ready to endorse REDD-plus and to make explicit reference to the “rights of indigenous peoples and members of local communities” ( UNFCCC, 2009 ). The reference is important because it acknowledges the historical background from which REDD-plus is developing: the historical dispossession, political exclusion and cultural marginalization of indigenous peoples and members of local communities (hereafter referred to as “forest people”). Recent experience with the recognition of forest people's rights suggests three broad principles for operationalizing rights under REDD-plus: participation in political decision-making, equitable distribution of forest benefits, and recognition of forest people's particular identities. In addition, the emphasis on rights requires the development of decision-making processes at multiple scales and related across scales. Global-scale institutions will be important but not sufficient in themselves. Effective and equitable REDD-plus requires nested forest and climate governance.</P>1 <h5>Forest people's rights and rights claims</h5> Past and present forest management in most tropical countries has dispossessed, excluded and marginalized forest people. Colonial and independent governments have placed forests under state ownership and set up centralized forestry departments to manage them. Political decision-making has excluded forest people from meaningful participation, even http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Environmental Change Elsevier

REDD-plus, forest people's rights and nested climate governance

Global Environmental Change, Volume 20 (3) – Aug 1, 2010

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-3780
DOI
10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2010.04.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

At Copenhagen, the Ad Hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA) was ready to endorse REDD-plus and to make explicit reference to the “rights of indigenous peoples and members of local communities” ( UNFCCC, 2009 ). The reference is important because it acknowledges the historical background from which REDD-plus is developing: the historical dispossession, political exclusion and cultural marginalization of indigenous peoples and members of local communities (hereafter referred to as “forest people”). Recent experience with the recognition of forest people's rights suggests three broad principles for operationalizing rights under REDD-plus: participation in political decision-making, equitable distribution of forest benefits, and recognition of forest people's particular identities. In addition, the emphasis on rights requires the development of decision-making processes at multiple scales and related across scales. Global-scale institutions will be important but not sufficient in themselves. Effective and equitable REDD-plus requires nested forest and climate governance.</P>1 <h5>Forest people's rights and rights claims</h5> Past and present forest management in most tropical countries has dispossessed, excluded and marginalized forest people. Colonial and independent governments have placed forests under state ownership and set up centralized forestry departments to manage them. Political decision-making has excluded forest people from meaningful participation, even

Journal

Global Environmental ChangeElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2010

References

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