Reconstructing clear water state and submersed vegetation on behalf of repeated flocculation with modified soil in an in situ mesocosm experiment in Lake Taihu

Reconstructing clear water state and submersed vegetation on behalf of repeated flocculation with... The geo-engineering approach of modified soil flocculation has been widely applied to mitigate algal blooms and eutrophication in relatively small lakes. Nevertheless, its potential ecological risks and feasibility should be examined and identified prior to its application in large natural lakes given the multiple functions of these water bodies in human health and welfare. In situ mesocosm experiments on modified soil flocculation were performed in Lake Taihu during summer 2010 and 2011. Chitosan-modified kaolinite (CMK) soil was used to flocculate algal blooms and improve water transparency to facilitate the re-establishment of the submersed macrophyte Vallisneria natans in this shallow eutrophic lake. Moreover, the ecological effects of CMK soil were assessed. Results showed that repeated additions of CMK (0.3g/L for each time) improved water quality in terms of Chl-a, TN, and TP concentrations; TN/TP ratio; turbidity; redox conditions; and nitrification and denitrification activities. These effects lasted for 48days. After the fourth dose of CMK, the biomass of all phytoplankton categories, except for that of Cryptophyta, decreased by >90% (ca. 1–2×106cell/L or 0.38–0.55mg/L of wet weight). Zooplankton biomass markedly decreased after the first CMK addition, and copepods became dominant. These effects, however, did not last for the long term. Most importantly, submersed V. natans was restored successfully when water clarity and quality were improved through repeated CMK flocculation. Nevertheless, the indices of carbohydrate depletion and free amino acid accumulation indicated that the plant experienced physiological stresses. The reestablishment of V. natans reinforced the positive effects of repeated CMK dosing on water quality, and promoted a clear water state. V. natans is recommended for vegetative restoration in shallow eutrophic lakes given its facile transplantation, high stress tolerance, and physiological traits, which can be applied as indices of post-flocculation effects. In summary, the combination of repeated CMK dosing and revegetation of V. natans can feasibly improve water quality and initiate the restoration of a clear water state in shallow eutrophic lakes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Science of the Total Environment Elsevier

Reconstructing clear water state and submersed vegetation on behalf of repeated flocculation with modified soil in an in situ mesocosm experiment in Lake Taihu

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/reconstructing-clear-water-state-and-submersed-vegetation-on-behalf-of-LWIBXq59e0
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0048-9697
eISSN
1879-1026
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.01.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The geo-engineering approach of modified soil flocculation has been widely applied to mitigate algal blooms and eutrophication in relatively small lakes. Nevertheless, its potential ecological risks and feasibility should be examined and identified prior to its application in large natural lakes given the multiple functions of these water bodies in human health and welfare. In situ mesocosm experiments on modified soil flocculation were performed in Lake Taihu during summer 2010 and 2011. Chitosan-modified kaolinite (CMK) soil was used to flocculate algal blooms and improve water transparency to facilitate the re-establishment of the submersed macrophyte Vallisneria natans in this shallow eutrophic lake. Moreover, the ecological effects of CMK soil were assessed. Results showed that repeated additions of CMK (0.3g/L for each time) improved water quality in terms of Chl-a, TN, and TP concentrations; TN/TP ratio; turbidity; redox conditions; and nitrification and denitrification activities. These effects lasted for 48days. After the fourth dose of CMK, the biomass of all phytoplankton categories, except for that of Cryptophyta, decreased by >90% (ca. 1–2×106cell/L or 0.38–0.55mg/L of wet weight). Zooplankton biomass markedly decreased after the first CMK addition, and copepods became dominant. These effects, however, did not last for the long term. Most importantly, submersed V. natans was restored successfully when water clarity and quality were improved through repeated CMK flocculation. Nevertheless, the indices of carbohydrate depletion and free amino acid accumulation indicated that the plant experienced physiological stresses. The reestablishment of V. natans reinforced the positive effects of repeated CMK dosing on water quality, and promoted a clear water state. V. natans is recommended for vegetative restoration in shallow eutrophic lakes given its facile transplantation, high stress tolerance, and physiological traits, which can be applied as indices of post-flocculation effects. In summary, the combination of repeated CMK dosing and revegetation of V. natans can feasibly improve water quality and initiate the restoration of a clear water state in shallow eutrophic lakes.

Journal

Science of the Total EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off