Racial Disparities in Oncologic Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy: Long-term Follow-up

Racial Disparities in Oncologic Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy: Long-term Follow-up Racial differences in prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality are well known. The incidence of PCa is about 60% higher in African American (AA) men compared with white men, and mortality rates for AA men are 2-3 times greater. 1 However, there is controversy in the literature as to whether AA race is an independent predictor of adverse oncologic outcomes for patients with clinically localized PCa. 2,3 A prior study at our institution analyzed outcomes in 326 AA men and 4962 white men who had been treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) between 1988 and 2004 and found that there was no association between AA race and adverse pathologic features or biochemical recurrence (BCR). 4 </P>However, there is growing evidence that AA men with PCa may harbor more aggressive tumors. Sanchez-Ortiz et al 5 found that AA men with clinical stage T1c disease had higher postprostatectomy Gleason scores, greater cancer volume, and greater tumor volume per ng/mL of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) compared with matched white men. Synthesizing data from autopsy and surgical studies, Powell et al 6 have suggested that PCa in AA men, compared with white men, grows and progresses more rapidly with 4-fold increased rates of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Urology Elsevier

Racial Disparities in Oncologic Outcomes After Radical Prostatectomy: Long-term Follow-up

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0090-4295
DOI
10.1016/j.urology.2014.08.039
pmid
25432835
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Racial differences in prostate cancer (PCa) incidence and mortality are well known. The incidence of PCa is about 60% higher in African American (AA) men compared with white men, and mortality rates for AA men are 2-3 times greater. 1 However, there is controversy in the literature as to whether AA race is an independent predictor of adverse oncologic outcomes for patients with clinically localized PCa. 2,3 A prior study at our institution analyzed outcomes in 326 AA men and 4962 white men who had been treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) between 1988 and 2004 and found that there was no association between AA race and adverse pathologic features or biochemical recurrence (BCR). 4 </P>However, there is growing evidence that AA men with PCa may harbor more aggressive tumors. Sanchez-Ortiz et al 5 found that AA men with clinical stage T1c disease had higher postprostatectomy Gleason scores, greater cancer volume, and greater tumor volume per ng/mL of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) compared with matched white men. Synthesizing data from autopsy and surgical studies, Powell et al 6 have suggested that PCa in AA men, compared with white men, grows and progresses more rapidly with 4-fold increased rates of

Journal

UrologyElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 2014

References

  • Race is not an independent predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy in an equal access medical center
    Freedland, S.J.; Jalkut, M.; Dorey, F.
  • Epidemiology of radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer in the era of prostate-specific antigen: an overview of the Department of Defense Center for Prostate Disease Research national database
    Moul, J.W.; Wu, H.; Sun, L.
  • Explaining racial differences in prostate cancer in the United States: sociology or biology?
    Freedland, S.J.; Isaacs, W.B.
  • Ethnic variation in pelvimetric measures and its impact on positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy
    von Bodman, C.; Matikainen, M.P.; Yunis, L.H.
  • Interplay of race, socioeconomic status, and treatment on survival of patients with prostate cancer
    Schwartz, K.; Powell, I.J.; Underwood, W.

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