Quality measurement of fruits and vegetables

Quality measurement of fruits and vegetables To investigate and control quality, one must be able to measure quality-related attributes. Quality of produce encompasses sensory attributes, nutritive values, chemical constituents, mechanical properties, functional properties and defects. Instrumental measurements are often preferred to sensory evaluations in research and commercial situations because they reduce variations in judgment among individuals and can provide a common language among researchers, industry and consumers. Essentially, electromagnetic (often optical) properties relate to appearance, mechanical properties to texture, and chemical properties to flavor (taste and aroma). Instruments can approximate human judgments by imitating the way people test the product or by measuring fundamental properties and combining those mathematically to categorize the quality. Only people can judge quality, but instruments that measure quality-related attributes are vital for research and for inspection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Postharvest Biology and Technology Elsevier

Quality measurement of fruits and vegetables

Postharvest Biology and Technology, Volume 15 (3) – Mar 1, 1999

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0925-5214
DOI
10.1016/S0925-5214(98)00086-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To investigate and control quality, one must be able to measure quality-related attributes. Quality of produce encompasses sensory attributes, nutritive values, chemical constituents, mechanical properties, functional properties and defects. Instrumental measurements are often preferred to sensory evaluations in research and commercial situations because they reduce variations in judgment among individuals and can provide a common language among researchers, industry and consumers. Essentially, electromagnetic (often optical) properties relate to appearance, mechanical properties to texture, and chemical properties to flavor (taste and aroma). Instruments can approximate human judgments by imitating the way people test the product or by measuring fundamental properties and combining those mathematically to categorize the quality. Only people can judge quality, but instruments that measure quality-related attributes are vital for research and for inspection.

Journal

Postharvest Biology and TechnologyElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 1999

References

  • Delayed light emission as a biochemical indicator of papaya heat treatment
    Chan, H.T.; Forbus, W.B.
  • Application of magnetic resonance imaging to pre- and post-harvest studies of fruit and vegetables
    Clark, C.J.; Hockings, P.D.; Joyce, D.C.; Mazucco, R.A.
  • Measurement of papaya maturity by delayed light emission
    Forbus, W.R.; Senter, S.D.; Chan, H.T.
  • Nondestructive measurement of canary melon maturity by delayed light emission
    Forbus, W.R.; Dull, G.G.; Smittle, D.A.
  • The Measurement of Appearance
    Hunter, R.S.; Harold, R.W.
  • The effects of chilling stress on the chlorophyll fluorescence of leaves
    Melcarek, P.K.; Brown, G.N.
  • Characterization and failure in solid foods with particular reference to fruits and vegetables
    Mohsenin, N.N.
  • Classification of avocado by firmness and maturity
    Peleg, K.; Ben-Hanan, U.; Hinga, S.
  • Defect detection in apples by means of x-ray imaging
    Schatzki, T.F.; Haff, R.P.; Young, R.; Can, I.; Le, L.C.; Toyofuku, N.
  • Portable, solid-state fluorometer for the measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence induction in plants
    Schreiber, U.; Groberman, L.; Vidaver, W.
  • Nondestructive determination of soluble solids in tomatoes using near infrared spectroscopy
    Slaughter, D.C.; Barrett, D.; Boersig, M.
  • Assay of chilling injury in wild and domestic tomatoes based on photosystem activity of the chilled leaves
    Smillie, R.M.; Nott, R.
  • Neural network classification of wheat using single kernel near-infrared transmittance spectra
    Song, H.; Delwiche, S.R.; Chen, Y.R.
  • Nondestructive testing for identifying poor quality onions
    Tollner, E.W.; Hung, Y.C.; Maw, B.W.; Sumner, D.R.; Gitaitis, R.D.

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