PXY, a Receptor-like Kinase Essential for Maintaining Polarity during Plant Vascular-Tissue Development

PXY, a Receptor-like Kinase Essential for Maintaining Polarity during Plant Vascular-Tissue... All plant tissue is ultimately derived from the meristems, and the molecular mechanisms that control growth of apical meristems have been widely studied (reviewed in (1, 2) ). In contrast, much less attention has been paid to vascular meristems, such as the cambium and procambium, even though these meristems are the source of woody tissue and therefore generate the majority of plant biomass. Although biomass may represent a novel source of renewable energy (3) , little is known about the molecular regulation of vascular-meristem activity. The vascular meristems participate in a highly ordered developmental process with a very prominent polarity. This polarity results in precisely orientated divisions of meristematic initials that generate files of cells, which differentiate into highly specialized and spatially separated xylem and phloem cells ( Figure 1 A). The factors that are necessary to establish and maintain this polarity remain unknown. This manuscript describes the identification of the pxy mutant in which the spatial organization of vascular development is lost and the xylem and phloem are partially interspersed. The PXY gene encodes for a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that defines a novel role for RLKs in the meristem where it functions to maintain the cell polarity required for the orientation of cell division during vascular development. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Biology Elsevier

PXY, a Receptor-like Kinase Essential for Maintaining Polarity during Plant Vascular-Tissue Development

Current Biology, Volume 17 (12) – Jun 19, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/pxy-a-receptor-like-kinase-essential-for-maintaining-polarity-during-3GYvbt7KzS
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0960-9822
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cub.2007.05.049
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

All plant tissue is ultimately derived from the meristems, and the molecular mechanisms that control growth of apical meristems have been widely studied (reviewed in (1, 2) ). In contrast, much less attention has been paid to vascular meristems, such as the cambium and procambium, even though these meristems are the source of woody tissue and therefore generate the majority of plant biomass. Although biomass may represent a novel source of renewable energy (3) , little is known about the molecular regulation of vascular-meristem activity. The vascular meristems participate in a highly ordered developmental process with a very prominent polarity. This polarity results in precisely orientated divisions of meristematic initials that generate files of cells, which differentiate into highly specialized and spatially separated xylem and phloem cells ( Figure 1 A). The factors that are necessary to establish and maintain this polarity remain unknown. This manuscript describes the identification of the pxy mutant in which the spatial organization of vascular development is lost and the xylem and phloem are partially interspersed. The PXY gene encodes for a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that defines a novel role for RLKs in the meristem where it functions to maintain the cell polarity required for the orientation of cell division during vascular development.

Journal

Current BiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 19, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off