Public policy and the supply of food

Public policy and the supply of food Current policies and programs affecting the supply of food are examined and options assessed for changes that would help generate a food supply consistent with the US population eating according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Potential policy and program changes are identified in three categories: eliminating existing domestic farm and trade program limitations on the US food supply; creating incentives or disincentives, such as taxes or subsidies, to produce foods consistent with the Dietary Guidelines; and influencing consumers directly to choose foods consistent with the Dietary Guidelines. Despite the trend toward liberalization, there remain a few changes in farm and trade policy that would increase consumption of under-consumed foods. Taxes and subsidies are difficult to apply without creating unintended adverse consequences, although removal of production input constraints may be effective. Strategies to influence consumer behavior have advantages over policies designed to affect supplies of foods. Rather than large program interventions, changes in consumer tastes and preferences would drive market forces to efficiently produce the needed food supply. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Food Policy Elsevier

Public policy and the supply of food

Food Policy, Volume 24 (2) – May 1, 1999

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0306-9192
eISSN
1873-5657
DOI
10.1016/S0306-9192(99)00027-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current policies and programs affecting the supply of food are examined and options assessed for changes that would help generate a food supply consistent with the US population eating according to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Potential policy and program changes are identified in three categories: eliminating existing domestic farm and trade program limitations on the US food supply; creating incentives or disincentives, such as taxes or subsidies, to produce foods consistent with the Dietary Guidelines; and influencing consumers directly to choose foods consistent with the Dietary Guidelines. Despite the trend toward liberalization, there remain a few changes in farm and trade policy that would increase consumption of under-consumed foods. Taxes and subsidies are difficult to apply without creating unintended adverse consequences, although removal of production input constraints may be effective. Strategies to influence consumer behavior have advantages over policies designed to affect supplies of foods. Rather than large program interventions, changes in consumer tastes and preferences would drive market forces to efficiently produce the needed food supply.

Journal

Food PolicyElsevier

Published: May 1, 1999

References

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