Psychophysics of reading. XVIII. The effect of print size on reading speed in normal peripheral vision

Psychophysics of reading. XVIII. The effect of print size on reading speed in normal peripheral... Reading in peripheral vision is slow and requires large print, posing substantial difficulty for patients with central scotomata. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of print size on reading speed at different eccentricities in normal peripheral vision. We hypothesized that reading speeds should remain invariant with eccentricity, as long as the print is appropriately scaled in size—the scaling hypothesis. The scaling hypothesis predicts that log–log plots of reading speed versus print size exhibit the same shape at all eccentricities, but shift along the print-size axis. Six normal observers read aloud single sentences (∼11 words in length) presented on a computer monitor, one word at a time, using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). We measured reading speeds (based on RSVP exposure durations yielding 80% correct) for eight print sizes at each of six retinal eccentricities, from 0 (foveal) to 20 deg in the inferior visual field. Consistent with the scaling hypothesis, plots of reading speed versus print size had the same shape at different eccentricities: reading speed increased with print size, up to a critical print size and was then constant at a maximum reading speed for larger print sizes. Also consistent with the scaling hypothesis, the plots shifted horizontally such that average values of the critical print size increased from 0.16 deg (fovea) to 2.22 deg (20 deg peripheral). Inconsistent with the scaling hypothesis, the plots also exhibited vertical shifts so that average values of the maximum reading speed decreased from 807 w.p.m. (fovea) to 135 w.p.m. (20 deg peripheral). Because the maximum reading speed is not invariant with eccentricity even when the print size was scaled, we reject the scaling hypothesis and conclude that print size is not the only factor limiting maximum reading speed in normal peripheral vision. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vision Research Elsevier

Psychophysics of reading. XVIII. The effect of print size on reading speed in normal peripheral vision

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0042-6989
eISSN
1878-5646
DOI
10.1016/S0042-6989(98)00072-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reading in peripheral vision is slow and requires large print, posing substantial difficulty for patients with central scotomata. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of print size on reading speed at different eccentricities in normal peripheral vision. We hypothesized that reading speeds should remain invariant with eccentricity, as long as the print is appropriately scaled in size—the scaling hypothesis. The scaling hypothesis predicts that log–log plots of reading speed versus print size exhibit the same shape at all eccentricities, but shift along the print-size axis. Six normal observers read aloud single sentences (∼11 words in length) presented on a computer monitor, one word at a time, using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). We measured reading speeds (based on RSVP exposure durations yielding 80% correct) for eight print sizes at each of six retinal eccentricities, from 0 (foveal) to 20 deg in the inferior visual field. Consistent with the scaling hypothesis, plots of reading speed versus print size had the same shape at different eccentricities: reading speed increased with print size, up to a critical print size and was then constant at a maximum reading speed for larger print sizes. Also consistent with the scaling hypothesis, the plots shifted horizontally such that average values of the critical print size increased from 0.16 deg (fovea) to 2.22 deg (20 deg peripheral). Inconsistent with the scaling hypothesis, the plots also exhibited vertical shifts so that average values of the maximum reading speed decreased from 807 w.p.m. (fovea) to 135 w.p.m. (20 deg peripheral). Because the maximum reading speed is not invariant with eccentricity even when the print size was scaled, we reject the scaling hypothesis and conclude that print size is not the only factor limiting maximum reading speed in normal peripheral vision.

Journal

Vision ResearchElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1998

References

  • Effect of magnification and field of view on reading speed using a CCTV
    Lovie-Kitchin, JE; Woo, GC
  • Psychophysics of reading–XVI. The visual span in normal and low vision
    Legge, GE; Ahn, SJ; Klitz, TS; Luebker, A
  • Visual resolution, contrast sensitivity,and the cortical magnification factor
    Virsu, V; Rovamo, J
  • A comparison of word recognition and reading performance in foveal and peripheral vision
    Latham, K; Whitaker, D
  • Putting frequencies in the dictionary
    Kilgarriff, A
  • Detection and identification of mirror-image letter pairs in central and peripheral vision
    Higgins, KE; Arditi, A; Knoblauch, K
  • Mr. Chips: an ideal-observer model of reading
    Legge, GE; Klitz, TS; Tjan, BS

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