Psychophysical evidence for a magnocellular pathway deficit in dyslexia

Psychophysical evidence for a magnocellular pathway deficit in dyslexia The relationship between reading ability and psychophysical performance was examined to test the hypothesis that dyslexia is associated with a deficit in the magnocellular (M) pathway. Speed discrimination thresholds and contrast detection thresholds were measured under conditions (low mean luminance, low spatial frequency, high temporal frequency) for which psychophysical performance presumably depends on M pathway integrity. Dyslexic subjects had higher psychophysical thresholds than controls in both the speed discrimination and contrast detection tasks, but only the differences in speed thresholds were statistically significant. In addition, there was a strong correlation between individual differences in speed thresholds and reading rates. These results support the hypothesis for an M pathway abnormality in dyslexia, and suggest that motion discrimination may be a more sensitive psychophysical predictor of dyslexia than contrast sensitivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vision Research Elsevier

Psychophysical evidence for a magnocellular pathway deficit in dyslexia

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/elsevier/psychophysical-evidence-for-a-magnocellular-pathway-deficit-in-vijMlTbpYd
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0042-6989
eISSN
1878-5646
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0042-6989(98)00075-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The relationship between reading ability and psychophysical performance was examined to test the hypothesis that dyslexia is associated with a deficit in the magnocellular (M) pathway. Speed discrimination thresholds and contrast detection thresholds were measured under conditions (low mean luminance, low spatial frequency, high temporal frequency) for which psychophysical performance presumably depends on M pathway integrity. Dyslexic subjects had higher psychophysical thresholds than controls in both the speed discrimination and contrast detection tasks, but only the differences in speed thresholds were statistically significant. In addition, there was a strong correlation between individual differences in speed thresholds and reading rates. These results support the hypothesis for an M pathway abnormality in dyslexia, and suggest that motion discrimination may be a more sensitive psychophysical predictor of dyslexia than contrast sensitivity.

Journal

Vision ResearchElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 1998

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off