Protein engineering of cellulases

Protein engineering of cellulases Current Opinion in Biotechnology 2014, 29 :139–145</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Cell and pathway engineering </P>Edited by Tina Lütke-Eversloh and Keith EJ Tyo </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 8th May 2014</P>0958-1669/$ – see front matter, © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2014.04.007 </P>Overview and introduction</h5> This review focuses on recent protein engineering efforts, both site-specific and random, mostly since 2009, on a range of proteins important for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, not only exocellulases and endocellulases but also helper proteins, such as lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPO), swollenins, and expansins.</P>The subject recently has been reviewed by Wilson [ 1 ], Clarke et al . [ 2 ], and Kellermann et al . [ 3 ]. Major advances during the reporting period can be found on the subjects of, first, the development of LPO [ 4 ], second, the thermostabilization of Cel6A and Cel7A via SCHEMA-guided recombination [ 5,6 • ], and, third, the computationally-based findings of the importance of the linker sequence for binding onto cellulose surfaces [ 7–9 ].</P>The present review presents recent progress classified by: first, protein, second, protein domain, that is, catalytic unit, linker sequence, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Biotechnology Elsevier

Protein engineering of cellulases

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0958-1669
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.copbio.2014.04.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current Opinion in Biotechnology 2014, 29 :139–145</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Cell and pathway engineering </P>Edited by Tina Lütke-Eversloh and Keith EJ Tyo </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 8th May 2014</P>0958-1669/$ – see front matter, © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2014.04.007 </P>Overview and introduction</h5> This review focuses on recent protein engineering efforts, both site-specific and random, mostly since 2009, on a range of proteins important for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials, not only exocellulases and endocellulases but also helper proteins, such as lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPO), swollenins, and expansins.</P>The subject recently has been reviewed by Wilson [ 1 ], Clarke et al . [ 2 ], and Kellermann et al . [ 3 ]. Major advances during the reporting period can be found on the subjects of, first, the development of LPO [ 4 ], second, the thermostabilization of Cel6A and Cel7A via SCHEMA-guided recombination [ 5,6 • ], and, third, the computationally-based findings of the importance of the linker sequence for binding onto cellulose surfaces [ 7–9 ].</P>The present review presents recent progress classified by: first, protein, second, protein domain, that is, catalytic unit, linker sequence, and

Journal

Current Opinion in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2014

References

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