Potential role of childrearing practices in the development of anxiety and depression

Potential role of childrearing practices in the development of anxiety and depression There is a vast literature describing the importance of childrearing factors in the development of anxiety and depression. Unfortunately, much of this work comes from diverse areas, has variable theoretical bases, and makes use of a variety of methods, each with its own limitations. Thus, conclusions about the state of the research are difficult to draw. This review pulls together literature related to childrearing factors and anxiety and depression from a wide variety of areas. Many of the studies are methodologically limited and results have been variable. Nevertheless, there is surprising consistency that suggests that rejection and control by parents may be positively related to later anxiety and depression. There is also more limited evidence to indicate that rejection may be more strongly associated with depression, whereas control is more specifically associated with anxiety. Limitations of the research are highlighted and specific suggestions for future research directions are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Psychology Review Elsevier

Potential role of childrearing practices in the development of anxiety and depression

Clinical Psychology Review, Volume 17 (1) – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0272-7358
DOI
10.1016/S0272-7358(96)00040-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is a vast literature describing the importance of childrearing factors in the development of anxiety and depression. Unfortunately, much of this work comes from diverse areas, has variable theoretical bases, and makes use of a variety of methods, each with its own limitations. Thus, conclusions about the state of the research are difficult to draw. This review pulls together literature related to childrearing factors and anxiety and depression from a wide variety of areas. Many of the studies are methodologically limited and results have been variable. Nevertheless, there is surprising consistency that suggests that rejection and control by parents may be positively related to later anxiety and depression. There is also more limited evidence to indicate that rejection may be more strongly associated with depression, whereas control is more specifically associated with anxiety. Limitations of the research are highlighted and specific suggestions for future research directions are discussed.

Journal

Clinical Psychology ReviewElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1997

References

  • One-year outcomes of depressive disorders in child psychiatric in-patients: Evaluation of the prognostic power of a brief measure of expressed emotion
    Asarnow, J.R.; Goldstein, M.J.; Tompson, M.; Guthrie, D.
  • Parental bonding and depressive disorders in adolescents
    Burbach, D.J.; Kashani, J.H.; Rosenberg, T.K.
  • Determinants of expressed emotion in families of disturbed and normal children
    Hibbs, E.D.; Hamburger, S.D.; Lenane, M.; Rapoport, J.L.; Kruesi, M.J.P.; Keysor, C.S.; Goldstein, M.J.
  • Recall of parental behaviors in female neurotic depressives
    Lamont, J.; Fischoff, S.; Gottlieb, H.
  • Convergent recall of parental behaviors in depressed students of different racial groups
    Lamont, J.; Gottlieb, H.
  • A parental bonding instrument
    Parker, G.; Tupling, H.; Brown, L.B.
  • Diagnostic specificity of a brief measure of expressed emotion: A community study of children
    Stubbe, D.E.; Zahner, G.E.P.; Goldstein, M.J.; Leckman, J.F.
  • Dependency, self-criticism, and recollections of parenting: Sex differences and the role of depressive affect
    Whiffen, V.E.; Sasseville, T.M.

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