Polychlorinated biphenyls in Nepalese surface soils: Spatial distribution, air-soil exchange, and soil-air partitioning

Polychlorinated biphenyls in Nepalese surface soils: Spatial distribution, air-soil exchange, and... Regardless of the ban on the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) decade ago, significant measures of PCBs are still transmitted from essential sources in cities and are all inclusive ecological contaminants around the world. In this study, the concentrations of PCBs in soil, the air-soil exchange of PCBs, and the soil-air partitioning coefficient (KSA) of PCBs were investigated in four noteworthy urban areas in Nepal. Overall, the concentrations of ∑30PCBs ranged from 10 to 59.4ng/g dry weight; dw (mean 12.2ng/g ±11.2ng/g dw). The hexa-CBs (22–31%) was most dominant among several PCB-homologues, followed by tetra-CBs (20–29%), hepta-CBs (12–21%), penta-CBs (15–17%) and tri-CBs (9–19%). The sources of elevated level of PCBs discharge in Nepalese soil was identified as emission from transformer oil, lubricants, breaker oil, cutting oil and paints, and cable insulation. Slightly strong correlation of PCBs with TOC than BC demonstrated that amorphous organic matter (AOM) assumes a more critical part in holding of PCBs than BC in Nepalese soil. The fugacity fraction (ff) results indicated the soil being the source of PCB in air through volatilization and net transport from soil to air. The soil-air partitioning coefficient study suggests the absorption by soil organic matter control soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Slightly weak but positive correlation of measured Log KSA with Log KOA (R2 = 0.483) and Log KBC-A (R2 = 0.438) suggests that both Log KOA and Log KBC-A can predict soil-air partitioning to lesser extent for PCBs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety Elsevier

Polychlorinated biphenyls in Nepalese surface soils: Spatial distribution, air-soil exchange, and soil-air partitioning

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0147-6513
eISSN
1090-2414
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2017.06.057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Regardless of the ban on the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) decade ago, significant measures of PCBs are still transmitted from essential sources in cities and are all inclusive ecological contaminants around the world. In this study, the concentrations of PCBs in soil, the air-soil exchange of PCBs, and the soil-air partitioning coefficient (KSA) of PCBs were investigated in four noteworthy urban areas in Nepal. Overall, the concentrations of ∑30PCBs ranged from 10 to 59.4ng/g dry weight; dw (mean 12.2ng/g ±11.2ng/g dw). The hexa-CBs (22–31%) was most dominant among several PCB-homologues, followed by tetra-CBs (20–29%), hepta-CBs (12–21%), penta-CBs (15–17%) and tri-CBs (9–19%). The sources of elevated level of PCBs discharge in Nepalese soil was identified as emission from transformer oil, lubricants, breaker oil, cutting oil and paints, and cable insulation. Slightly strong correlation of PCBs with TOC than BC demonstrated that amorphous organic matter (AOM) assumes a more critical part in holding of PCBs than BC in Nepalese soil. The fugacity fraction (ff) results indicated the soil being the source of PCB in air through volatilization and net transport from soil to air. The soil-air partitioning coefficient study suggests the absorption by soil organic matter control soil-air partitioning of PCBs. Slightly weak but positive correlation of measured Log KSA with Log KOA (R2 = 0.483) and Log KBC-A (R2 = 0.438) suggests that both Log KOA and Log KBC-A can predict soil-air partitioning to lesser extent for PCBs.

Journal

Ecotoxicology and Environmental SafetyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2017

References

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