Political geographies of surveillance

Political geographies of surveillance 1 Introduction: Surveillance and the everyday</h5> Information technologies have permeated many different domains of human activity, leading scholars and commentators alike to declare the present era an information age ( Lyon, 1988; Webster, 1995; Castells, 1996, 1997, 1998 ). Whilst the meaning and adequacy of the term are matters for discussion ( Castells, 2000, p. 10; Webster, 2002 ), the prevalence of information generation and processing in the present-day world is scarcely open to dispute (see for example Lefebvre, 2005 ).</P>If information technologies proliferate today, they also imply ever-increasing possibilities of tracking and profiling our daily activities. Recent disclosures regarding the U.S. National Security Agency’s mass-surveillance programmes have provided dramatic evidence thereof. However, the role of information technology in the monitoring and administration of everyday life reaches far beyond such state-driven and policing-centred schemes. Today, computerised systems that act as conduits for multiple cross-cutting forms of data gathering, data transfer and data analysis control, protect and manage everyday life on multiple levels, for security, administrative, commercial and political purposes. Think, for example, of the rapidly expanding use of RFID chips in tickets and goods, of the increasing number of surveillance cameras in public places, of computerised loyalty systems http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geoforum Elsevier

Political geographies of surveillance

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-7185
eISSN
1872-9398
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.geoforum.2013.08.010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction: Surveillance and the everyday</h5> Information technologies have permeated many different domains of human activity, leading scholars and commentators alike to declare the present era an information age ( Lyon, 1988; Webster, 1995; Castells, 1996, 1997, 1998 ). Whilst the meaning and adequacy of the term are matters for discussion ( Castells, 2000, p. 10; Webster, 2002 ), the prevalence of information generation and processing in the present-day world is scarcely open to dispute (see for example Lefebvre, 2005 ).</P>If information technologies proliferate today, they also imply ever-increasing possibilities of tracking and profiling our daily activities. Recent disclosures regarding the U.S. National Security Agency’s mass-surveillance programmes have provided dramatic evidence thereof. However, the role of information technology in the monitoring and administration of everyday life reaches far beyond such state-driven and policing-centred schemes. Today, computerised systems that act as conduits for multiple cross-cutting forms of data gathering, data transfer and data analysis control, protect and manage everyday life on multiple levels, for security, administrative, commercial and political purposes. Think, for example, of the rapidly expanding use of RFID chips in tickets and goods, of the increasing number of surveillance cameras in public places, of computerised loyalty systems

Journal

GeoforumElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2013

References

  • Rings of steel, rings of concrete and rings of confidence: designing out terrorism in central London pre and post September 11th
    Coaffee, J.
  • The surveillant assemblage
    Haggerty, K.D.; Ericson, R.
  • The New Politics of Surveillance and Visibility

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