Physiological effects caused by microcystin-producing and non-microcystin producing Microcystis aeruginosa on medaka fish: A proteomic and metabolomic study on liver

Physiological effects caused by microcystin-producing and non-microcystin producing Microcystis... Cyanobacterial blooms have become a common phenomenon in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Microcystis is an important bloom-forming and toxin-producing genus in continental aquatic ecosystems, which poses a potential risk to Human populations as well as on aquatic organisms. Microcystis is known to produce along with various bioactive peptides, the microcystins (MCs) that have attracted more attention notably due to their high hepatotoxicity.To better understand the effects of cyanobacterial blooms on fish, medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were sub-chronically exposed to either non-MC-producing or MC-producing living strains and, for this latter, to its subsequent MC-extract of Microcystis aeruginosa. Toxicological effects on liver have been evaluated through the combined approach of histopathology and ‘omics’ (i.e. proteomics and metabolomics). All treatments induce sex-dependent effects at both cellular and molecular levels. Moreover, the modalities of exposure appear to induce differential responses as the direct exposure to the cyanobacterial strains induce more acute effects than the MC-extract treatment. Our histopathological observations indicate that both non-MC-producing and MC-producing strains induce cellular impairments. Both proteomic and metabolomic analyses exhibit various biological disruptions in the liver of females and males exposed to strain and extract treatments. These results support the hypothesis that M. aeruginosa is able to produce bioactive peptides, other than MCs, which can induce toxicological effects in fish liver. Moreover, they highlight the importance of considering cyanobacterial cells as a whole to assess the realistic environmental risk of cyanobacteria on fish. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Physiological effects caused by microcystin-producing and non-microcystin producing Microcystis aeruginosa on medaka fish: A proteomic and metabolomic study on liver

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.11.011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Cyanobacterial blooms have become a common phenomenon in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Microcystis is an important bloom-forming and toxin-producing genus in continental aquatic ecosystems, which poses a potential risk to Human populations as well as on aquatic organisms. Microcystis is known to produce along with various bioactive peptides, the microcystins (MCs) that have attracted more attention notably due to their high hepatotoxicity.To better understand the effects of cyanobacterial blooms on fish, medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were sub-chronically exposed to either non-MC-producing or MC-producing living strains and, for this latter, to its subsequent MC-extract of Microcystis aeruginosa. Toxicological effects on liver have been evaluated through the combined approach of histopathology and ‘omics’ (i.e. proteomics and metabolomics). All treatments induce sex-dependent effects at both cellular and molecular levels. Moreover, the modalities of exposure appear to induce differential responses as the direct exposure to the cyanobacterial strains induce more acute effects than the MC-extract treatment. Our histopathological observations indicate that both non-MC-producing and MC-producing strains induce cellular impairments. Both proteomic and metabolomic analyses exhibit various biological disruptions in the liver of females and males exposed to strain and extract treatments. These results support the hypothesis that M. aeruginosa is able to produce bioactive peptides, other than MCs, which can induce toxicological effects in fish liver. Moreover, they highlight the importance of considering cyanobacterial cells as a whole to assess the realistic environmental risk of cyanobacteria on fish.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

References

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