Phylogenetics of Cancer Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura)

Phylogenetics of Cancer Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) We used morphological, mitochondrial DNA sequence, paleontological, and biogeographical information to examine the evolutionary history of crabs of the genus Cancer. Phylogenies inferred from adult morphology and DNA sequence of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene were each well resolved and well supported, but differed substantially in topology. Four lines of evidence suggested that the COI data set accurately reflected Cancer phylogeny: (1) in the phylogeny inferred from morphological data, each Atlantic species was sister taxon to an ecologically similar Pacific species, suggesting convergence in morphology; (2) a single trans-Arctic dispersal event, as indicated by the phylogeny inferred from COI, is more parsimonious than two such dispersal events, as inferred from morphology; (3) test and application of a maximum likelihood molecular clock to the COI data yielded estimates of origin and speciation times that fit well with the fossil record; and (4) the tree inferred from the combined COI and morphology data was closely similar to the trees inferred from COI, although notably less well supported by the bootstrap. The phylogeny inferred from maximum likelihood analysis of COI suggested that Cancer originated in the North Pacific in the early Miocene, that the Atlantic species arose from a North Pacific ancestor, and that Cancer crabs invaded the Atlantic from the North Pacific 6–12 mya. This inferred invasion time is notably prior to most estimates of the date of submergence of the Bering Strait and the trans-Arctic interchange, but it agrees with fossil evidence placing at least one Cancer species in the Atlantic about 8 mya. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution Elsevier

Phylogenetics of Cancer Crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Academic Press
ISSN
1055-7903
eISSN
1095-9513
D.O.I.
10.1006/mpev.1998.0608
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We used morphological, mitochondrial DNA sequence, paleontological, and biogeographical information to examine the evolutionary history of crabs of the genus Cancer. Phylogenies inferred from adult morphology and DNA sequence of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene were each well resolved and well supported, but differed substantially in topology. Four lines of evidence suggested that the COI data set accurately reflected Cancer phylogeny: (1) in the phylogeny inferred from morphological data, each Atlantic species was sister taxon to an ecologically similar Pacific species, suggesting convergence in morphology; (2) a single trans-Arctic dispersal event, as indicated by the phylogeny inferred from COI, is more parsimonious than two such dispersal events, as inferred from morphology; (3) test and application of a maximum likelihood molecular clock to the COI data yielded estimates of origin and speciation times that fit well with the fossil record; and (4) the tree inferred from the combined COI and morphology data was closely similar to the trees inferred from COI, although notably less well supported by the bootstrap. The phylogeny inferred from maximum likelihood analysis of COI suggested that Cancer originated in the North Pacific in the early Miocene, that the Atlantic species arose from a North Pacific ancestor, and that Cancer crabs invaded the Atlantic from the North Pacific 6–12 mya. This inferred invasion time is notably prior to most estimates of the date of submergence of the Bering Strait and the trans-Arctic interchange, but it agrees with fossil evidence placing at least one Cancer species in the Atlantic about 8 mya.

Journal

Molecular Phylogenetics and EvolutionElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1999

References

  • Crab carapace hydrodynamics
    Blake, R.W.
  • Branch support and tree stability
    Bremer, K.
  • Seasonal abundance, size composition, and growth of rock crab, Cancer antennarius Stimpson, off central California
    Carroll, J.C.
  • Phylogenetics of social behavior in Australian gall-forming thrips: Evidence from mitochondrial DNA sequence, adult morphology and behavior, and gall morphology
    Crespi, B.J.; Carmean, D.A.; Mound, L.A.; Worobey, M.; Morris, D.
  • Separate versus combined analysis of phylogenetic evidence
    de Queiroz, A.; Donoghue, M.J.; Kim, J.
  • Testing significance of incongruence
    Farris, J.S.; Kallersjo, M.; Kluge, A.G.; Bult, C.
  • Molecular versus morphological approaches to systematics
    Hillis, D.M.
  • Biology and ecology of the rock crab, Cancer irroratus Say, 1817, in southern New England waters (Decapoda, Brachyura)
    Reilly, P.N.; Saila, B.
  • Character congruence of multiple data partitions and the origin of Hawaiian Drosophilidae
    Remsen, J.; DeSalle, R.
  • Invasion and extinction: The last three million years of North Sea pelecypod history
    Vermeij, G.J.

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