Phylogenetic evidence for parallel adaptive origins of digestive RNases in Asian and African leaf monkeys: A response to Xu et al. (2009)

Phylogenetic evidence for parallel adaptive origins of digestive RNases in Asian and African leaf... Identification of parallel amino acid substitutions accompanying parallel phenotypic evolution is of considerable interest to molecular evolutionists because such parallel substitutions are likely to be adaptive and functionally important ( Stewart et al., 1987; Yokoyama and Yokoyama, 1990; Zhang and Kumar, 1997 ). In 2006, I reported that the gene encoding pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase1) was duplicated independently in Asian and African colobine monkeys ( Zhang, 2006 ). Statistical analyses of DNA sequences, functional assays of reconstructed ancestral proteins, and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the new genes acquired enhanced digestive efficiencies through three parallel amino acid replacements driven by positive selection. They also lost a non-digestive function independently, under a relaxed selective constraint. In a recent Short Communication, Xu and colleagues suggested that the independent duplications that I reported were actually only one duplication event and that the adaptive parallel substitutions I described were no longer existent or were explainable by hypermutations at CpG sites ( Xu et al., 2009 ). Xu et al.’s claims were not supported by available evidence. Below, I provide a detailed response and offer additional phylogenetic evidence for parallel adaptive evolution of digestive RNases in Asian and African colobines. In my original analysis ( http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution Elsevier

Phylogenetic evidence for parallel adaptive origins of digestive RNases in Asian and African leaf monkeys: A response to Xu et al. (2009)

Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution, Volume 53 (2) – Nov 1, 2009

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1055-7903
eISSN
1095-9513
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ympev.2009.07.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Identification of parallel amino acid substitutions accompanying parallel phenotypic evolution is of considerable interest to molecular evolutionists because such parallel substitutions are likely to be adaptive and functionally important ( Stewart et al., 1987; Yokoyama and Yokoyama, 1990; Zhang and Kumar, 1997 ). In 2006, I reported that the gene encoding pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase1) was duplicated independently in Asian and African colobine monkeys ( Zhang, 2006 ). Statistical analyses of DNA sequences, functional assays of reconstructed ancestral proteins, and site-directed mutagenesis showed that the new genes acquired enhanced digestive efficiencies through three parallel amino acid replacements driven by positive selection. They also lost a non-digestive function independently, under a relaxed selective constraint. In a recent Short Communication, Xu and colleagues suggested that the independent duplications that I reported were actually only one duplication event and that the adaptive parallel substitutions I described were no longer existent or were explainable by hypermutations at CpG sites ( Xu et al., 2009 ). Xu et al.’s claims were not supported by available evidence. Below, I provide a detailed response and offer additional phylogenetic evidence for parallel adaptive evolution of digestive RNases in Asian and African colobines. In my original analysis (

Journal

Molecular Phylogenetics and EvolutionElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2009

References

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