Phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and physicochemical properties of Brazilian Apis mellifera honeys

Phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity and physicochemical properties of Brazilian Apis... Forty-nine honey samples from five monofloral (eucalyptus, mastic, wildflower, Japanese grape and quitoco) and six polyfloral honeys were analyzed for their physicochemical and antioxidant compounds. Levels of total phenolics and flavonoids as well as individual composition were analyzed by HPLC. The oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC), the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical assays (DPPH) were performed to determine antioxidant capacity. The highest antioxidant capacity was observed in eucalyptus and mastic honeys; gallic acid levels were greatest in both of them while p-coumaric acid was highest in Japanese grape honey. Physicochemical and antioxidant properties of honey were found to be dependent on its botanical origin. Linear discriminant analysis was able to differentiate 90% of honeys in terms of the seasons when they were collected and the main discriminant responses were p-coumaric acid, titratable acidity, diastase activity, and total flavonoids content. LDA correctly classified 96% of honeys according to their botanical origin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png LWT - Food Science and Technology Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0023-6438
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.lwt.2018.01.016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Forty-nine honey samples from five monofloral (eucalyptus, mastic, wildflower, Japanese grape and quitoco) and six polyfloral honeys were analyzed for their physicochemical and antioxidant compounds. Levels of total phenolics and flavonoids as well as individual composition were analyzed by HPLC. The oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC), the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical assays (DPPH) were performed to determine antioxidant capacity. The highest antioxidant capacity was observed in eucalyptus and mastic honeys; gallic acid levels were greatest in both of them while p-coumaric acid was highest in Japanese grape honey. Physicochemical and antioxidant properties of honey were found to be dependent on its botanical origin. Linear discriminant analysis was able to differentiate 90% of honeys in terms of the seasons when they were collected and the main discriminant responses were p-coumaric acid, titratable acidity, diastase activity, and total flavonoids content. LDA correctly classified 96% of honeys according to their botanical origin.

Journal

LWT - Food Science and TechnologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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