PCR-based DNA Analysis for the Identification and Characterization of Food Components

PCR-based DNA Analysis for the Identification and Characterization of Food Components Analysis of specific nucleic acids in food allows control laboratories to determine the presence or absence of certain ingredients in complex products or the identification of specific characteristics of single food components. These analyses are based on nucleic acids probes, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which made the detection of minute amounts of degraded nucleic acids and their sequence determination possible. In this review, we describe the approaches that have been taken to detect low levels of contaminants such as wheat in dietary food for coeliac patients and pork meat or fat in sausages. In addition, these methods may also be used for the identification of meat or fish species and the recognition of genetically altered foods, including the FlavrSavr™ tomato. These examples indicate that a comprehensive description of food products based on the analysis of nucleic acids will be feasible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png LWT - Food Science and Technology Elsevier

PCR-based DNA Analysis for the Identification and Characterization of Food Components

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Academic Press
ISSN
0023-6438
DOI
10.1006/fstl.1996.0001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Analysis of specific nucleic acids in food allows control laboratories to determine the presence or absence of certain ingredients in complex products or the identification of specific characteristics of single food components. These analyses are based on nucleic acids probes, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which made the detection of minute amounts of degraded nucleic acids and their sequence determination possible. In this review, we describe the approaches that have been taken to detect low levels of contaminants such as wheat in dietary food for coeliac patients and pork meat or fat in sausages. In addition, these methods may also be used for the identification of meat or fish species and the recognition of genetically altered foods, including the FlavrSavr™ tomato. These examples indicate that a comprehensive description of food products based on the analysis of nucleic acids will be feasible.

Journal

LWT - Food Science and TechnologyElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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