Patient desire for chromosome analysis of products of conception following miscarriage: a national survey

Patient desire for chromosome analysis of products of conception following miscarriage: a... <h5>Objective</h5> Most first trimester miscarriages are due to fetal chromosome abnormalities. Karyotype analysis of products of conception (POC) can provide useful information regarding cause of loss and identify patients who need additional testing or counseling. Despite this, chromosome testing of POC is not routinely done. The objective of our study was to evaluate patient interest in testing and the frequency with which testing is currently performed.</P><h5>Design</h5> Anonymous web survey of patients with a history of miscarriage.</P><h5>Materials and Methods</h5> A web-based questionnaire was used to ask women about their miscarriage experience. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, miscarriage within 1 year and US resident. Participants were recruited using Google AdWords advertisements, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.genesecurity.net, and an advertisement flyer in local clinics. Only completed surveys of eligible patients were analyzed.</P><h5>Results</h5> 323 women consented to participate with the majority recruited through Google Adwords (300/323). 143 (48%) women from 41 states met inclusion criteria and completed the survey. On average, participants were 31 years old with 1.8 prior losses, completing the survey 3.8 months from time of loss. Only 10 participants (7%) reported receiving POC chromosome testing; 100% reported they would do it again. 65% without testing reported that they wished they could have had testing. Interestingly, although 65% reported being physically recovered from the miscarriage at the time of taking the survey only 27% reported feeling emotionally recovered.</P><h5>Conclusion</h5> Chromosome testing of POC is rarely performed in the US, despite high patient satisfaction with testing and a frequent desire for testing. Our data suggests that emotional recovery after miscarriage takes longer than physical recovery. However, given the low numbers of patients who had testing done in our study, we were not able to assess whether performing a karyotype will shorten the time to emotional recovery from miscarriage.</P> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Fertility and Sterility Elsevier

Patient desire for chromosome analysis of products of conception following miscarriage: a national survey

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0015-0282
DOI
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.07.352
Publisher site
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Abstract

<h5>Objective</h5> Most first trimester miscarriages are due to fetal chromosome abnormalities. Karyotype analysis of products of conception (POC) can provide useful information regarding cause of loss and identify patients who need additional testing or counseling. Despite this, chromosome testing of POC is not routinely done. The objective of our study was to evaluate patient interest in testing and the frequency with which testing is currently performed.</P><h5>Design</h5> Anonymous web survey of patients with a history of miscarriage.</P><h5>Materials and Methods</h5> A web-based questionnaire was used to ask women about their miscarriage experience. Inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, miscarriage within 1 year and US resident. Participants were recruited using Google AdWords advertisements, www.clinicaltrials.gov, www.genesecurity.net, and an advertisement flyer in local clinics. Only completed surveys of eligible patients were analyzed.</P><h5>Results</h5> 323 women consented to participate with the majority recruited through Google Adwords (300/323). 143 (48%) women from 41 states met inclusion criteria and completed the survey. On average, participants were 31 years old with 1.8 prior losses, completing the survey 3.8 months from time of loss. Only 10 participants (7%) reported receiving POC chromosome testing; 100% reported they would do it again. 65% without testing reported that they wished they could have had testing. Interestingly, although 65% reported being physically recovered from the miscarriage at the time of taking the survey only 27% reported feeling emotionally recovered.</P><h5>Conclusion</h5> Chromosome testing of POC is rarely performed in the US, despite high patient satisfaction with testing and a frequent desire for testing. Our data suggests that emotional recovery after miscarriage takes longer than physical recovery. However, given the low numbers of patients who had testing done in our study, we were not able to assess whether performing a karyotype will shorten the time to emotional recovery from miscarriage.</P>

Journal

Fertility and SterilityElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2011

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