Parental monitoring and helicopter parenting relevant to vocational student's procrastination and self-regulated learning

Parental monitoring and helicopter parenting relevant to vocational student's procrastination and... 1 Introduction</h5> The term helicopter parent, (i.e. parenting that involves hovering parents who are potentially over-involved in the lives of their child), has appeared in recent popular culture ( Padilla-Walker & Nelson, 2012 ). Padilla-Walker and Nelson suggested that helicopter parenting refers to parental regulation and structuring of the child's behavioral world including daily activities, homework and manners that are intrusive and manipulative of children's thoughts, feelings and attachment to the parents. Helicopter parenting captures parenting behavior that provides the child with high warmth and support, high control and low autonomy. Helicopter parents hover and micromanage their child's life by being overly protective and unwilling to let go ( Van Eck Peluchette, Kovanic, & Partridge, 2013 ). Previous studies indicated that helicopter parents can engage in this style of parenting when their children are emerging adults (e.g., Gabriel, 2010; Marano, 2010 ). However, a part of parent's responsibility is to support their child to complete learning tasks independently ( Wood, Bruner, & Ross, 1976 ), to plan and set goals, monitor performance, change learning strategies ( Pino-Pasternak & Whitebread, 2010 ), self-regulate to seek challenging tasks as opportunities for learning ( Winne & Hadwin, 2008; Zimmerman & Schunk, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Learning and Individual Differences Elsevier

Parental monitoring and helicopter parenting relevant to vocational student's procrastination and self-regulated learning

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
1041-6080
eISSN
1873-3425
DOI
10.1016/j.lindif.2015.08.003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> The term helicopter parent, (i.e. parenting that involves hovering parents who are potentially over-involved in the lives of their child), has appeared in recent popular culture ( Padilla-Walker & Nelson, 2012 ). Padilla-Walker and Nelson suggested that helicopter parenting refers to parental regulation and structuring of the child's behavioral world including daily activities, homework and manners that are intrusive and manipulative of children's thoughts, feelings and attachment to the parents. Helicopter parenting captures parenting behavior that provides the child with high warmth and support, high control and low autonomy. Helicopter parents hover and micromanage their child's life by being overly protective and unwilling to let go ( Van Eck Peluchette, Kovanic, & Partridge, 2013 ). Previous studies indicated that helicopter parents can engage in this style of parenting when their children are emerging adults (e.g., Gabriel, 2010; Marano, 2010 ). However, a part of parent's responsibility is to support their child to complete learning tasks independently ( Wood, Bruner, & Ross, 1976 ), to plan and set goals, monitor performance, change learning strategies ( Pino-Pasternak & Whitebread, 2010 ), self-regulate to seek challenging tasks as opportunities for learning ( Winne & Hadwin, 2008; Zimmerman & Schunk,

Journal

Learning and Individual DifferencesElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2015

References

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