Parental changes after involvement in their anxious child's cognitive behavior therapy

Parental changes after involvement in their anxious child's cognitive behavior therapy 1 Introduction</h5> Several theoretical models of the development of childhood anxiety disorders have over the years been posed and also empirically tested. Most etiological models (e.g., Ginsburg, Siqueland, Masia-Warner, & Hedtke, 2004; Murray, Creswell, & Cooper, 2009 ) incorporate the role of the parents as a potential risk and/or maintaining factor for the development of anxiety in the child. Although conceptual and terminological differences between the models exist, they generally incorporate parental psychopathology, parental rearing behaviors, and cognitions as factors contributing to both the general development and psychopathological development of the child.</P>Regarding direction, it has been suggested that parental factors may be linked with childhood anxiety by directly causing or eliciting anxiety in the child, and/or that the child's anxiety elicits the specific parenting behaviors ( Wood, McLeod, Sigman, Hwang, & Chu, 2003 ). The most consistent finding is within the area of parental control. Over-involvement or over-intrusive behavior, where parents provide unsolicited help and do not encourage autonomy in the child, seems to be one of the most influential rearing behaviors associated with anxiety disorders ( McLeod, Wood, & Avny, 2011; Rapee, Schniering, & Hudson, 2009 ). Thus, at present, the interaction between parental factors and child http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal Of Anxiety Disorders Elsevier

Parental changes after involvement in their anxious child's cognitive behavior therapy

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0887-6185
eISSN
1873-7897
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.07.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Several theoretical models of the development of childhood anxiety disorders have over the years been posed and also empirically tested. Most etiological models (e.g., Ginsburg, Siqueland, Masia-Warner, & Hedtke, 2004; Murray, Creswell, & Cooper, 2009 ) incorporate the role of the parents as a potential risk and/or maintaining factor for the development of anxiety in the child. Although conceptual and terminological differences between the models exist, they generally incorporate parental psychopathology, parental rearing behaviors, and cognitions as factors contributing to both the general development and psychopathological development of the child.</P>Regarding direction, it has been suggested that parental factors may be linked with childhood anxiety by directly causing or eliciting anxiety in the child, and/or that the child's anxiety elicits the specific parenting behaviors ( Wood, McLeod, Sigman, Hwang, & Chu, 2003 ). The most consistent finding is within the area of parental control. Over-involvement or over-intrusive behavior, where parents provide unsolicited help and do not encourage autonomy in the child, seems to be one of the most influential rearing behaviors associated with anxiety disorders ( McLeod, Wood, & Avny, 2011; Rapee, Schniering, & Hudson, 2009 ). Thus, at present, the interaction between parental factors and child

Journal

Journal Of Anxiety DisordersElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2014

References

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