Palaeogeography, subsidence and thermal history of the Neogene Styrian Basin (Pannonian basin system, Austria)

Palaeogeography, subsidence and thermal history of the Neogene Styrian Basin (Pannonian basin... The Neogene Styrian Basin represents an extensional structure on top of a crustal wedge, which was moving eastward during the final stages of the Alpine orogeny. Eastward extrusion was a consequence of continental escape and extensional collapse within the Eastern Alps. In a simple model the evolution of the Styrian Basin can be subdivided into an Early Miocene (Ottnangian to Karpatian) synrift and a subsequent postrift phase. Basement subsidence rates during the synrift phase reached 30 cm/100 yr and more than 2000 m of limnic to marine sediments were deposited. The coincidence of the synrift phase and the formation of pull apart structures along strike-slip zones bordering the eastward moving wedge is evidence for the close genetic relation between extrusion tectonics and basin formation. A Miocene magmatic phase is related to subduction along the Carpathian front. Magmatic activity started during the synrift stage and continued into the postrift stage. Heat flow in the vicinity of the Miocene volcanoes increased dramatically (> 300 mW/m 2 ). A second volcanic phase producing basalts in Plio-Pleistocene times had only little influence on the heat flow pattern. Limnic to marine sediments of the synrift stage are separated by a major unconformity from Middle to Late Miocene (Badenian to Pontian) marine to limnic/fluvial postrift sediments. Sedimentation during the postrift phase was controlled by marine ingressions during Middle Miocene (early Badenian and Sarmatian) times from the south and a subsequent regression with a decline in salinity. Subsidence rates during the postrift stage were mostly below 2.5 cm/100 yr. In Pliocene times subsidence was replaced by uplift, which resulted in erosion of a few hundred metres of sediment. Present-day high heat flows are a consequence of thinned crust beneath the Styrian Basin. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tectonophysics Elsevier

Palaeogeography, subsidence and thermal history of the Neogene Styrian Basin (Pannonian basin system, Austria)

Tectonophysics, Volume 242 (1) – Feb 15, 1995

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0040-1951
eISSN
1879-3266
DOI
10.1016/0040-1951(94)00155-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Neogene Styrian Basin represents an extensional structure on top of a crustal wedge, which was moving eastward during the final stages of the Alpine orogeny. Eastward extrusion was a consequence of continental escape and extensional collapse within the Eastern Alps. In a simple model the evolution of the Styrian Basin can be subdivided into an Early Miocene (Ottnangian to Karpatian) synrift and a subsequent postrift phase. Basement subsidence rates during the synrift phase reached 30 cm/100 yr and more than 2000 m of limnic to marine sediments were deposited. The coincidence of the synrift phase and the formation of pull apart structures along strike-slip zones bordering the eastward moving wedge is evidence for the close genetic relation between extrusion tectonics and basin formation. A Miocene magmatic phase is related to subduction along the Carpathian front. Magmatic activity started during the synrift stage and continued into the postrift stage. Heat flow in the vicinity of the Miocene volcanoes increased dramatically (> 300 mW/m 2 ). A second volcanic phase producing basalts in Plio-Pleistocene times had only little influence on the heat flow pattern. Limnic to marine sediments of the synrift stage are separated by a major unconformity from Middle to Late Miocene (Badenian to Pontian) marine to limnic/fluvial postrift sediments. Sedimentation during the postrift phase was controlled by marine ingressions during Middle Miocene (early Badenian and Sarmatian) times from the south and a subsequent regression with a decline in salinity. Subsidence rates during the postrift stage were mostly below 2.5 cm/100 yr. In Pliocene times subsidence was replaced by uplift, which resulted in erosion of a few hundred metres of sediment. Present-day high heat flows are a consequence of thinned crust beneath the Styrian Basin.

Journal

TectonophysicsElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 1995

References

  • Lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps, 1. Boundary conditions and experiments scaled for gravity
    Ratschbacher, L.; Merle, O.; Davy, Ph.; Cobbold, P.
  • Lateral extrusion in the Eastern Alps, 2. Structural analysis
    Ratschbacher, L.; Frisch, W.; Linzer, H-G.; Merle, O.
  • Evolution of the Pannonian basin system, 1. Tectonics
    Royden, L.H.; Horvath, F.; Rumpler, J.

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