Oxymorphone-induced analgesia and colonic motility measured in colorectal distension

Oxymorphone-induced analgesia and colonic motility measured in colorectal distension Changes in colonic motility in rats following intravenous (IV) oxymorphone (0.1 mg/kg), atropine (0.1 mg/kg), or saline were monitored to determine whether opioid-induced changes in colonic motility affect antinociceptive measurements when using colorectal distension (CRD) as a nociceptive assay. Polygraph recordings of colonic pressures, contraction frequencies, and the pressurevolume relationship of the stimulus showed that oxymorphone produced a transient increase in contraction frequencies when compared to atropine- and saline-treated rats. The transient increase in contraction frequency caused by oxymorphone declined to baseline levels at 30 min after administration, the time at which the nociceptive threshold for CRD was tested. Neither oxymorphone nor atropine changed baseline pressures or the pressure-volume curve for the balloon stimulus. Antinociceptive results from CRD at 30 min posttreatment showed that only oxymorphone produced significant antinociception. We conclude that oxymorphone does not produce changes in colonic motility that complicate antinociceptive measurements in CRD and that CRD is an effective means of testing opioid-induced visceral antinociception. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Elsevier

Oxymorphone-induced analgesia and colonic motility measured in colorectal distension

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0091-3057
eISSN
1873-5177
DOI
10.1016/0091-3057(95)00140-R
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Changes in colonic motility in rats following intravenous (IV) oxymorphone (0.1 mg/kg), atropine (0.1 mg/kg), or saline were monitored to determine whether opioid-induced changes in colonic motility affect antinociceptive measurements when using colorectal distension (CRD) as a nociceptive assay. Polygraph recordings of colonic pressures, contraction frequencies, and the pressurevolume relationship of the stimulus showed that oxymorphone produced a transient increase in contraction frequencies when compared to atropine- and saline-treated rats. The transient increase in contraction frequency caused by oxymorphone declined to baseline levels at 30 min after administration, the time at which the nociceptive threshold for CRD was tested. Neither oxymorphone nor atropine changed baseline pressures or the pressure-volume curve for the balloon stimulus. Antinociceptive results from CRD at 30 min posttreatment showed that only oxymorphone produced significant antinociception. We conclude that oxymorphone does not produce changes in colonic motility that complicate antinociceptive measurements in CRD and that CRD is an effective means of testing opioid-induced visceral antinociception.

Journal

Pharmacology Biochemistry and BehaviorElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 1995

References

  • Acute effects of morphine and opioid peptides on the motility and responses of rat colon to electrical stimulation
    Gillan, M.G.C.; Pollock, D.

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