Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in mouse kidney: effects of dietary lipid and vitamin E plus iron 1 1 Dr. Ung-Soo Lee is currently a member of the Department of Food Engineering, National Chung-Ju University, Jungwon-Gun, Chung-Buk 383-870, Korea, and Dr. Joseph Szabo is currently a member of the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Veterinary Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.

Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in mouse kidney: effects of dietary lipid and vitamin E... The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary fat, vitamin E, and iron on oxidative damage and antioxidant status in kidneys of mice. Sixty 1-month-old male Swiss-Webster mice were fed a basal vitamin E-deficient diet that contained either 8% fish oil + 2% corn oil or 10% lard with or without 1 g all-rac -α-tocopherol acetate or 0.74 g ferric citrate per kilogram of diet for 4 weeks. Significantly ( P < 0.05) higher levels of lipid peroxidation products, thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBAR), and conjugated dienes were found in the kidneys of mice fed with fish oil compared with mice fed lard irrespective of vitamin E status. Mice maintained on a vitamin E-deficient diet had significantly higher renal levels of TBAR, but not conjugated dienes, than the supplemented group. Fish oil fed mice receiving vitamin E supplementation had lower levels of α-tocopherol than did mice in the lard fed group. Significantly higher levels of ascorbic acid were also found in the kidneys of mice fed with fish oil than were found in mice fed lard. The levels of protein carbonyls and glutathione (GSH), and activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, selenium (Se)-GSH peroxidase, and non-Se-GSH peroxidase were not significantly altered by dietary fat or vitamin E. Dietary iron had no significant effect on any of the oxidative stress and antioxidant indices measured. The results obtained provide experimental evidence for the pro-oxidant effect of high fish oil intake in mouse kidney and suggest that dietary lipids play a key role in determining cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry Elsevier

Oxidative stress and antioxidant status in mouse kidney: effects of dietary lipid and vitamin E plus iron 1 1 Dr. Ung-Soo Lee is currently a member of the Department of Food Engineering, National Chung-Ju University, Jungwon-Gun, Chung-Buk 383-870, Korea, and Dr. Joseph Szabo is currently a member of the Department of Animal Sciences, University of Veterinary Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/oxidative-stress-and-antioxidant-status-in-mouse-kidney-effects-of-05zAjo4TfB
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Inc.
ISSN
0955-2863
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0955-2863(99)00053-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of dietary fat, vitamin E, and iron on oxidative damage and antioxidant status in kidneys of mice. Sixty 1-month-old male Swiss-Webster mice were fed a basal vitamin E-deficient diet that contained either 8% fish oil + 2% corn oil or 10% lard with or without 1 g all-rac -α-tocopherol acetate or 0.74 g ferric citrate per kilogram of diet for 4 weeks. Significantly ( P < 0.05) higher levels of lipid peroxidation products, thiobarbituric acid reactants (TBAR), and conjugated dienes were found in the kidneys of mice fed with fish oil compared with mice fed lard irrespective of vitamin E status. Mice maintained on a vitamin E-deficient diet had significantly higher renal levels of TBAR, but not conjugated dienes, than the supplemented group. Fish oil fed mice receiving vitamin E supplementation had lower levels of α-tocopherol than did mice in the lard fed group. Significantly higher levels of ascorbic acid were also found in the kidneys of mice fed with fish oil than were found in mice fed lard. The levels of protein carbonyls and glutathione (GSH), and activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, selenium (Se)-GSH peroxidase, and non-Se-GSH peroxidase were not significantly altered by dietary fat or vitamin E. Dietary iron had no significant effect on any of the oxidative stress and antioxidant indices measured. The results obtained provide experimental evidence for the pro-oxidant effect of high fish oil intake in mouse kidney and suggest that dietary lipids play a key role in determining cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress.

Journal

The Journal of Nutritional BiochemistryElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 1999

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off