Overall distributed model intercomparison project results

Overall distributed model intercomparison project results This paper summarizes results from the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP) study. DMIP simulations from twelve different models are compared with both observed streamflow and lumped model simulations. The lumped model simulations were produced using the same techniques used at National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS-RFCs) for historical calibrations and serve as a useful benchmark for comparison. The differences between uncalibrated and calibrated model performance are also assessed. Overall statistics are used to compare simulated and observed flows during all time steps, flood event statistics are calculated for selected storm events, and improvement statistics are used to measure the gains from distributed models relative to the lumped models and calibrated models relative to uncalibrated models. Although calibration strategies for distributed models are not as well defined as strategies for lumped models, the DMIP results show that some calibration efforts applied to distributed models significantly improve simulation results. Although for the majority of basin-distributed model combinations, the lumped model showed better overall performance than distributed models, some distributed models showed comparable results to lumped models in many basins and clear improvements in one or more basins. Noteworthy improvements in predicting flood peaks were demonstrated in a basin distinguishable from other basins studied in its shape, orientation, and soil characteristics. Greater uncertainties inherent to modeling small basins in general and distinguishable inter-model performance on the smallest basin (65 km 2 ) in the study point to the need for more studies with nested basins of various sizes. This will improve our understanding of the applicability and reliability of distributed models at various scales. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrology Elsevier

Overall distributed model intercomparison project results

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/overall-distributed-model-intercomparison-project-results-5U8mYfbWiq
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0022-1694
eISSN
1879-2707
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jhydrol.2004.03.031
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper summarizes results from the Distributed Model Intercomparison Project (DMIP) study. DMIP simulations from twelve different models are compared with both observed streamflow and lumped model simulations. The lumped model simulations were produced using the same techniques used at National Weather Service River Forecast Centers (NWS-RFCs) for historical calibrations and serve as a useful benchmark for comparison. The differences between uncalibrated and calibrated model performance are also assessed. Overall statistics are used to compare simulated and observed flows during all time steps, flood event statistics are calculated for selected storm events, and improvement statistics are used to measure the gains from distributed models relative to the lumped models and calibrated models relative to uncalibrated models. Although calibration strategies for distributed models are not as well defined as strategies for lumped models, the DMIP results show that some calibration efforts applied to distributed models significantly improve simulation results. Although for the majority of basin-distributed model combinations, the lumped model showed better overall performance than distributed models, some distributed models showed comparable results to lumped models in many basins and clear improvements in one or more basins. Noteworthy improvements in predicting flood peaks were demonstrated in a basin distinguishable from other basins studied in its shape, orientation, and soil characteristics. Greater uncertainties inherent to modeling small basins in general and distinguishable inter-model performance on the smallest basin (65 km 2 ) in the study point to the need for more studies with nested basins of various sizes. This will improve our understanding of the applicability and reliability of distributed models at various scales.

Journal

Journal of HydrologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off