Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium

Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium 1 Introduction</h5> Zinc (Zn) has been recognized as an essential trace element for the function or structure of more than 300 proteins [1,2] , and is involved in a great number of cellular processes, like DNA synthesis, enzyme activity and cell division [3,4] . It is believed that zinc can stimulate bone formation [5,6] , increase osteogenetic function in osteoblasts through exciting cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen synthesis and protein synthesis [7–10] . It is also well established that zinc can enhance osteoblast marker gene expressions [11] .</P>In addition, zinc possesses excellent antibacterial ability [12,13] . Zinc ions are demonstrated to inhibit multiple activities of bacteria, such as transmembrane proton translocation, glycolysis and acid tolerance [14] . Cummins et al. [15,16] found that many of its antibacterial actions may be caused by the reaction between zinc ions and sulfhydryl groups. Applerot et al. [17] reported that ZnO exhibits antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) due to a significant enhancement of the oxidative stress.</P>Zinc has thus attracted the interest of implanted materials, and has been incorporated into various kinds of biomaterials [18–20] . Our previous study demonstrated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces Elsevier

Osteogenic activity and antibacterial effect of zinc ion implanted titanium

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/osteogenic-activity-and-antibacterial-effect-of-zinc-ion-implanted-0tOCBFal94
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0927-7765
eISSN
1873-4367
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.colsurfb.2014.02.025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Zinc (Zn) has been recognized as an essential trace element for the function or structure of more than 300 proteins [1,2] , and is involved in a great number of cellular processes, like DNA synthesis, enzyme activity and cell division [3,4] . It is believed that zinc can stimulate bone formation [5,6] , increase osteogenetic function in osteoblasts through exciting cell proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen synthesis and protein synthesis [7–10] . It is also well established that zinc can enhance osteoblast marker gene expressions [11] .</P>In addition, zinc possesses excellent antibacterial ability [12,13] . Zinc ions are demonstrated to inhibit multiple activities of bacteria, such as transmembrane proton translocation, glycolysis and acid tolerance [14] . Cummins et al. [15,16] found that many of its antibacterial actions may be caused by the reaction between zinc ions and sulfhydryl groups. Applerot et al. [17] reported that ZnO exhibits antibacterial effect on both Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) and Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus ) due to a significant enhancement of the oxidative stress.</P>Zinc has thus attracted the interest of implanted materials, and has been incorporated into various kinds of biomaterials [18–20] . Our previous study demonstrated

Journal

Colloids and Surfaces B: BiointerfacesElsevier

Published: May 1, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off