Organic carbon sequestration under chaparral and pine after four decades of soil development

Organic carbon sequestration under chaparral and pine after four decades of soil development Soils are the largest carbon reservoir of terrestrial ecosystems, and play a central role in the global carbon cycle. The large lysimeter installation at the San Dimas Experimental Forest in southern California allowed quantification of carbon storage in a biosequence of soils under chamise ( Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook. and Am.), hoaryleaf ceanothus ( Ceanothus crassifolius Torr.), scrub oak ( Quercus dumosa Nutt.), and Coulter pine ( Pinus coulteri B. Don). After four decades of soil development, carbon sequestration in the lysimeters ranged from 4552 to 17,561 g m −2 . Carbon accretion in the mineral soils (0–1 m) under chaparral represented a larger percentage of total above-ground biomass (23–27%) as compared to the pine (13%). Also, contribution of the A horizon to whole soil (0–1 m) OC sequestration was higher under chaparral than under pine. Carbon accretion in the surface horizons was related to earthworm activity, which was intense under scrub oak, but absent under pine. Soils sampled in 1987 and corresponding archived fill materials were fractionated according to density and mineral particle size fractions, and analyzed for OC and N by dry combustion. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in all mineral soil fractions can be ranked from highest to lowest by plant species: ceanothus > chamise > scrub oak > Coulter pine. Under chaparral, a greater proportion of total soil carbon was recovered in the sand fraction as compared to the pine. The C N ratio of this sand-sized organic matter was higher under chaparral than under pine. This is indicative of fresh plant residues that may not contribute to the long-term carbon storage in soils. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geoderma Elsevier

Organic carbon sequestration under chaparral and pine after four decades of soil development

Geoderma, Volume 83 (3) – May 1, 1998

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0016-7061
eISSN
1872-6259
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0016-7061(97)00142-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Soils are the largest carbon reservoir of terrestrial ecosystems, and play a central role in the global carbon cycle. The large lysimeter installation at the San Dimas Experimental Forest in southern California allowed quantification of carbon storage in a biosequence of soils under chamise ( Adenostoma fasciculatum Hook. and Am.), hoaryleaf ceanothus ( Ceanothus crassifolius Torr.), scrub oak ( Quercus dumosa Nutt.), and Coulter pine ( Pinus coulteri B. Don). After four decades of soil development, carbon sequestration in the lysimeters ranged from 4552 to 17,561 g m −2 . Carbon accretion in the mineral soils (0–1 m) under chaparral represented a larger percentage of total above-ground biomass (23–27%) as compared to the pine (13%). Also, contribution of the A horizon to whole soil (0–1 m) OC sequestration was higher under chaparral than under pine. Carbon accretion in the surface horizons was related to earthworm activity, which was intense under scrub oak, but absent under pine. Soils sampled in 1987 and corresponding archived fill materials were fractionated according to density and mineral particle size fractions, and analyzed for OC and N by dry combustion. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations in all mineral soil fractions can be ranked from highest to lowest by plant species: ceanothus > chamise > scrub oak > Coulter pine. Under chaparral, a greater proportion of total soil carbon was recovered in the sand fraction as compared to the pine. The C N ratio of this sand-sized organic matter was higher under chaparral than under pine. This is indicative of fresh plant residues that may not contribute to the long-term carbon storage in soils.

Journal

GeodermaElsevier

Published: May 1, 1998

References

  • Nitrogen deposition in California forests: A review
    Bytnerowicz, A.; Fenn, M.E.
  • Nitrogen fixation by Ceanothus
    Delwiche, C.C.; Zinke, P.J.; Johnson, C.M.
  • Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
    Houghton, J.T.; Jenkins, G.J.; Ephraums, J.J.
  • Carbon balance in terrestrial detritus
    Schlesinger, W.H.
  • Transformations of 2:1 phyllosilicates in 41-year-old soils under oak and pine
    Tice, K.R.; Graham, R.C.; Wood, H.B.
  • Comparison of carbon dynamics in tropical and temperate soils using radiocarbon measurements
    Trumbore, S.E.
  • Decade-scale changes of soil carbon, nitrogen, and exchangeable cations under chaparral and pine
    Ulery, A.L.; Graham, R.C.; Chadwick, O.A.; Wood, H.B.

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