On the effect of anisotropy on the turbulent dispersion and deposition of small particles

On the effect of anisotropy on the turbulent dispersion and deposition of small particles 1 <h5>Introduction</h5> A widely used method for the prediction of particle dispersion in turbulent flows is based on the eddy interaction model, or EIM, (see, for example, Gosman and Ioannides, 1981 ; or Shuen et al., 1984 ). In this model, the instantaneous flow field is reconstructed from mean flow quantities by assuming that it is comprised of eddies whose lifetimes and length scales can be deduced from local mean flow quantities. Usually, a turbulence model of the k – ϵ type is used to provide values of the mean flow quantities and, as a consequence, the reconstructed fluctuating part of the flow field is isotropic. This feature is a deficiency of the model which becomes significant in regions where the turbulence structure is anisotropic. The deficiency can be overcome by more sophisticated models which use the information provided by Reynolds-stress turbulence models (see, for example, Berlemont et al., 1990 ; Zhou and Leschziner, 1991 ; Zhou and Leschziner, 1996 and Burry and Bergeles, 1993 ). However, k – ϵ models are still widely used in industrial flow problems to predict mean flow quantities in regions where the flow is anisotropic. It is, therefore, the aim of this http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Multiphase Flow Elsevier

On the effect of anisotropy on the turbulent dispersion and deposition of small particles

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0301-9322
DOI
10.1016/S0301-9322(98)00053-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 <h5>Introduction</h5> A widely used method for the prediction of particle dispersion in turbulent flows is based on the eddy interaction model, or EIM, (see, for example, Gosman and Ioannides, 1981 ; or Shuen et al., 1984 ). In this model, the instantaneous flow field is reconstructed from mean flow quantities by assuming that it is comprised of eddies whose lifetimes and length scales can be deduced from local mean flow quantities. Usually, a turbulence model of the k – ϵ type is used to provide values of the mean flow quantities and, as a consequence, the reconstructed fluctuating part of the flow field is isotropic. This feature is a deficiency of the model which becomes significant in regions where the turbulence structure is anisotropic. The deficiency can be overcome by more sophisticated models which use the information provided by Reynolds-stress turbulence models (see, for example, Berlemont et al., 1990 ; Zhou and Leschziner, 1991 ; Zhou and Leschziner, 1996 and Burry and Bergeles, 1993 ). However, k – ϵ models are still widely used in industrial flow problems to predict mean flow quantities in regions where the flow is anisotropic. It is, therefore, the aim of this

Journal

International Journal of Multiphase FlowElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 1999

References

  • Dispersion of solid particles in turbulent flow through pipe expansions
    Graham, D.I.; James, P.W.

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