On-farm soil N supply and N nutrition in the rice–wheat system of Nepal and Bangladesh

On-farm soil N supply and N nutrition in the rice–wheat system of Nepal and Bangladesh On-farm research to evaluate the productivity and nitrogen (N) nutrition of a rice ( Oryza sativa L.)–wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) cropping system was conducted with 21 farmers in the piedmont of Nepal and with 21 farmers in northwest Bangladesh. In Nepal, two levels of N-fertilizer (0–22–42 and 100–22–42 kg N–P–K ha −1 ) and farmers’ nutrient management practices were tested in the rice season, and three levels of N (0–22–42, 70–22–42, and 100–22–42) and farmers’ practices were evaluated in the wheat season. The treatments in Bangladesh included a researchers managed minus-N plot (0–22–42) and the farmers’ practices. Rice and wheat yields were higher in all treatments than the 0–22–42 control plots, with the exception of rice with the farmers’ practices at one location in Bangladesh. The researchers’ treatment of 100–22–42 in Nepal resulted in larger yields of both rice and wheat than the farmers’ practices, indicating that farmers’ rates of N-fertilizer (mean 49 kg N ha −1 ) were too low. Delaying wheat seeding reduced yields in the fertilized plots in both countries, especially as N-fertilizer dose increased. Soil N-supplying capacities (SNSC), measured as total N accumulation from the zero-N plots (0–22–42), and grain yields without N additions were greater for rice than for wheat in both Nepal and Bangladesh. Higher SNSC in rice was probably due to greater mineralization of soil organic N in the warm, moist conditions of the monsoon season than in the cooler, drier wheat season. However, SNSC was not correlated with total soil N, two soil N availability tests (hot KCl-extractable NH 4 + or 7-day anaerobic incubation), exchangeable NH 4 + or NO 3 − . Wheat in Nepal had greater N-recovery efficiency, agronomic efficiency of N, and physiological efficiency of N than rice. Nitrogen internal-use efficiency of rice for all treatments in both countries was within published ranges of maximum sufficiency and maximum dilution. In wheat, the relationship between grain yield and N accumulation was linear indicating that mobilization of plant N to the grain was less affected by biotic and abiotic stresses than in rice. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Field Crops Research Elsevier

On-farm soil N supply and N nutrition in the rice–wheat system of Nepal and Bangladesh

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/on-farm-soil-n-supply-and-n-nutrition-in-the-rice-wheat-system-of-UYw3CmkKVX
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0378-4290
eISSN
1872-6852
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0378-4290(99)00063-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On-farm research to evaluate the productivity and nitrogen (N) nutrition of a rice ( Oryza sativa L.)–wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) cropping system was conducted with 21 farmers in the piedmont of Nepal and with 21 farmers in northwest Bangladesh. In Nepal, two levels of N-fertilizer (0–22–42 and 100–22–42 kg N–P–K ha −1 ) and farmers’ nutrient management practices were tested in the rice season, and three levels of N (0–22–42, 70–22–42, and 100–22–42) and farmers’ practices were evaluated in the wheat season. The treatments in Bangladesh included a researchers managed minus-N plot (0–22–42) and the farmers’ practices. Rice and wheat yields were higher in all treatments than the 0–22–42 control plots, with the exception of rice with the farmers’ practices at one location in Bangladesh. The researchers’ treatment of 100–22–42 in Nepal resulted in larger yields of both rice and wheat than the farmers’ practices, indicating that farmers’ rates of N-fertilizer (mean 49 kg N ha −1 ) were too low. Delaying wheat seeding reduced yields in the fertilized plots in both countries, especially as N-fertilizer dose increased. Soil N-supplying capacities (SNSC), measured as total N accumulation from the zero-N plots (0–22–42), and grain yields without N additions were greater for rice than for wheat in both Nepal and Bangladesh. Higher SNSC in rice was probably due to greater mineralization of soil organic N in the warm, moist conditions of the monsoon season than in the cooler, drier wheat season. However, SNSC was not correlated with total soil N, two soil N availability tests (hot KCl-extractable NH 4 + or 7-day anaerobic incubation), exchangeable NH 4 + or NO 3 − . Wheat in Nepal had greater N-recovery efficiency, agronomic efficiency of N, and physiological efficiency of N than rice. Nitrogen internal-use efficiency of rice for all treatments in both countries was within published ranges of maximum sufficiency and maximum dilution. In wheat, the relationship between grain yield and N accumulation was linear indicating that mobilization of plant N to the grain was less affected by biotic and abiotic stresses than in rice.

Journal

Field Crops ResearchElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References

  • Nitrogen use-efficiency in tropical lowland rice systems: contributions from indigenous and applied nitrogen
    Cassman, K.G; Gines, G.C; Dizon, M.A; Samson, M.I; Alcantara, J.M
  • Interpreting fertilizer-use efficiency in relation to soil nutrient-supplying capacity, factor productivity, and agronomic efficiency
    Olk, D; Cassman, K.G; Simbahan, G; Sta Cruz, P.C; Adulrachman, S; Nagarajan, R; Tan, P.S; Satawathananont, S
  • Soil N supply and plant N uptake by irrigated rice in Tamil Nadu
    Thiyagarajan, T.M; Stalin, P; Dobermann, A; Cassman, K.G; ten Berge, H.F.M

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off