Novel perspectives for the engineering of abiotic stress tolerance in plants

Novel perspectives for the engineering of abiotic stress tolerance in plants Current Opinion in Biotechnology 2014, 26 :62–70</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Plant biotechnology </P>Edited by Birger Lindberg Møller and R George Ratcliffe </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 23rd October 2013</P>0958-1669/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.011 </P>Introduction</h5> One of the most active fields of research in plant science focuses on the understanding of plant molecular, physiological and genetic responses to environmental stress conditions, and the development of approaches towards improving tolerance and acclimation. Drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and high irradiation among a plethora of sources of abiotic stress, are perceived by sensor systems leading to the activation of complex regulatory networks controlling the expression of effector genes to counteract the detrimental effects and re-establish cellular homeostasis [ 1,2 • ].</P>The classical approach to engineer plants for enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress consists in strengthening the endogenous systems by intervening at different levels of the response, from sensors and signalling/regulatory elements (e.g. kinases, transcription factors), to direct-action genes or effectors (e.g. antioxidant enzymes, heat-shock proteins, enzymes for the synthesis of osmo-protectants) [ 2 • ,3,4 ]. Even though this strategy shows relative levels of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Biotechnology Elsevier

Novel perspectives for the engineering of abiotic stress tolerance in plants

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0958-1669
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.011
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Abstract

Current Opinion in Biotechnology 2014, 26 :62–70</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Plant biotechnology </P>Edited by Birger Lindberg Møller and R George Ratcliffe </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 23rd October 2013</P>0958-1669/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.copbio.2013.09.011 </P>Introduction</h5> One of the most active fields of research in plant science focuses on the understanding of plant molecular, physiological and genetic responses to environmental stress conditions, and the development of approaches towards improving tolerance and acclimation. Drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and high irradiation among a plethora of sources of abiotic stress, are perceived by sensor systems leading to the activation of complex regulatory networks controlling the expression of effector genes to counteract the detrimental effects and re-establish cellular homeostasis [ 1,2 • ].</P>The classical approach to engineer plants for enhanced tolerance to abiotic stress consists in strengthening the endogenous systems by intervening at different levels of the response, from sensors and signalling/regulatory elements (e.g. kinases, transcription factors), to direct-action genes or effectors (e.g. antioxidant enzymes, heat-shock proteins, enzymes for the synthesis of osmo-protectants) [ 2 • ,3,4 ]. Even though this strategy shows relative levels of

Journal

Current Opinion in BiotechnologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2014

References

  • ROS and redox signalling in the response of plants to abiotic stress
    Suzuki, N.; Koussevitzky, S.; Mittler, R.; Miller, G.
  • Research on plant abiotic stress responses in the post-genome era: past, present and future
    Hirayama, T.; Shinozaki, K.
  • Genetic engineering for modern agriculture: challenges and perspectives
    Mittler, R.; Blumwald, E.
  • Reactive oxygen species homeostasis and signalling during drought and salinity stresses
    Miller, G.; Suzuki, N.; Ciftci-Yilmaz, S.; Mittler, R.
  • Tobacco chloroplast transformants expressing genes encoding dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase, exhibit altered anti-oxidant metabolism and improved abiotic stress tolerance
    Le Martret, B.; Poage, M.; Shiel, K.; Nugent, G.D.; Dix, P.J.
  • Transcription factors as tools to engineer enhanced drought stress tolerance in plants
    Hussain, S.S.; Amjad, M.
  • Survival and growth of Arabidopsis plants given limited water are not equal
    Skirycz, A.; Vandenbroucke, K.; Clauw Pe; Maleux, K.; De Meyer, B.; Dhondt, S.; Pucci, A.; Gonzalez, N.; Hoebrichts, F.; Tognetti, V.B.
  • Protein SUMOylation and plant abiotic stress signaling: in silico case study of rice RLKs, heat-shock and Ca 2+ -binding proteins
    Raorane, M.L.; Mutte, S.K.; Kohli, A.
  • Strategies to ameliorate abiotic stress-induced plant senescence
    Gepstein, S.; Glick, B.R.
  • Over-expression of microRNA169 confers enhanced drought tolerance to tomato
    Zhang, X.; Zou, Z.; Gong, P.

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