Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation

Non-IgE mediated mast cell activation 1 Introduction</h5> Mast cells are thought to play a pivotal role in allergy and other inflammatory diseases. While IgE is thought to have a central role in mast cell activation by cross-linking of the high affinity FcεRI ( Okayama et al., 2008 ), also non-IgE mediated mast cell activation may be of importance in the pathophysiology of various inflammatory conditions.</P>Mast cells are located in close contact with external environment, where they can recognize and be activated by invasive pathogens through complement- and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-dependent pathways ( Marshall, 2004 ). They are also located close to sensory nerve endings, where they are triggered by a pleotropic variety of neuropeptides, such as substance P, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurotrophins, suggesting that mast cells are involved in neuro-inflammatory diseases ( Kulka et al., 2008 ). Moreover, mast cells can respond to various inflammatory products, such as IgG, cytokines, chemokines, adenosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), indicating the potential importance of mast cell activation in the initiation and propagation of inflammation in chronic inflammatory diseases. Apart from these endogenous stimuli, some exogenous molecules can also directly activate mast cells, causing drug side-effects or exacerbating allergic conditions in individuals. In http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pharmacology Elsevier

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0014-2999
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ejphar.2015.07.017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Mast cells are thought to play a pivotal role in allergy and other inflammatory diseases. While IgE is thought to have a central role in mast cell activation by cross-linking of the high affinity FcεRI ( Okayama et al., 2008 ), also non-IgE mediated mast cell activation may be of importance in the pathophysiology of various inflammatory conditions.</P>Mast cells are located in close contact with external environment, where they can recognize and be activated by invasive pathogens through complement- and pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-dependent pathways ( Marshall, 2004 ). They are also located close to sensory nerve endings, where they are triggered by a pleotropic variety of neuropeptides, such as substance P, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neurotrophins, suggesting that mast cells are involved in neuro-inflammatory diseases ( Kulka et al., 2008 ). Moreover, mast cells can respond to various inflammatory products, such as IgG, cytokines, chemokines, adenosine, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), indicating the potential importance of mast cell activation in the initiation and propagation of inflammation in chronic inflammatory diseases. Apart from these endogenous stimuli, some exogenous molecules can also directly activate mast cells, causing drug side-effects or exacerbating allergic conditions in individuals. In

Journal

European Journal of PharmacologyElsevier

Published: May 5, 2016

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