Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes

Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2013, 17 :462–471</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Energy </P>Edited by Michael D Burkart and Stephen P Mayfield </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 23rd April 2013</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.037 </P>Introduction</h5> Geopolitical instability in petroleum-producing areas and concerns about global climate change are driving interest in biofuels. Although first-generation biofuels, like ethanol and biodiesel, have achieved significant milestones, next-generation fuels will need to have higher fuel density and be more compatible with current engines and infrastructure. Additionally, most biofuels are currently produced from sources grown on valuable agricultural land, leading to direct competition with food crops. For next-generation biofuels to be economically and environmentally sustainable, they must have high mitigation potential for greenhouse gas emissions and be produced from renewable resources that do not compete with food, such as lignocellulose from plants grown on marginal land, agricultural waste (polysaccharides, lignin, triglycerides, and proteins) [ 1 ], or CO 2 . Some bacterial species natively use these carbon sources, while others natively produce advanced fuels such as butanol; however, to date, no organism can efficiently achieve both. Efforts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Elsevier

Next generation biofuel engineering in prokaryotes

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1367-5931
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.037
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2013, 17 :462–471</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Energy </P>Edited by Michael D Burkart and Stephen P Mayfield </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 23rd April 2013</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.037 </P>Introduction</h5> Geopolitical instability in petroleum-producing areas and concerns about global climate change are driving interest in biofuels. Although first-generation biofuels, like ethanol and biodiesel, have achieved significant milestones, next-generation fuels will need to have higher fuel density and be more compatible with current engines and infrastructure. Additionally, most biofuels are currently produced from sources grown on valuable agricultural land, leading to direct competition with food crops. For next-generation biofuels to be economically and environmentally sustainable, they must have high mitigation potential for greenhouse gas emissions and be produced from renewable resources that do not compete with food, such as lignocellulose from plants grown on marginal land, agricultural waste (polysaccharides, lignin, triglycerides, and proteins) [ 1 ], or CO 2 . Some bacterial species natively use these carbon sources, while others natively produce advanced fuels such as butanol; however, to date, no organism can efficiently achieve both. Efforts

Journal

Current Opinion in Chemical BiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References

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