New enzyme insights drive advances in commercial ethanol production

New enzyme insights drive advances in commercial ethanol production Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2014, 19 :162–170</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Biocatalysis and biotransformation </P>Edited by Jeffrey C Moore and Uwe T Bornscheuer </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 24th March 2014</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.02.015 </P>Introduction</h5> Today's biofuel production from sugars derives from two basic processes; ethanol produced by fermenting sugars from high starch containing grain or sugar cane, or increasingly from cellulose and hemicellulose feedstocks. With continued innovation, enzymes have repeatedly proven themselves to be one of if not the most vital components in the production of biofuels by these processes. Here we describe new enzymes and recent advancements first in the grain to alcohol process followed by ‘advanced’ biofuels. Because of mankind's long history in converting grains to alcohol, one might expect only small, incremental improvements to the process. Yet in the past few years new innovations have enabled the industry to continue ramping up ethanol per bushel of corn ground. In addition, the dry-milling industry has been able to establish a new revenue stream from corn oil, which is used for both cooking oil and production of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Elsevier

New enzyme insights drive advances in commercial ethanol production

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1367-5931
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.02.015
Publisher site
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Abstract

Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2014, 19 :162–170</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Biocatalysis and biotransformation </P>Edited by Jeffrey C Moore and Uwe T Bornscheuer </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 24th March 2014</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2014.02.015 </P>Introduction</h5> Today's biofuel production from sugars derives from two basic processes; ethanol produced by fermenting sugars from high starch containing grain or sugar cane, or increasingly from cellulose and hemicellulose feedstocks. With continued innovation, enzymes have repeatedly proven themselves to be one of if not the most vital components in the production of biofuels by these processes. Here we describe new enzymes and recent advancements first in the grain to alcohol process followed by ‘advanced’ biofuels. Because of mankind's long history in converting grains to alcohol, one might expect only small, incremental improvements to the process. Yet in the past few years new innovations have enabled the industry to continue ramping up ethanol per bushel of corn ground. In addition, the dry-milling industry has been able to establish a new revenue stream from corn oil, which is used for both cooking oil and production of

Journal

Current Opinion in Chemical BiologyElsevier

Published: Apr 1, 2014

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