Neurotrophin signal transduction in the nervous system

Neurotrophin signal transduction in the nervous system Neurotrophins use two types of receptors, the Trk tyrosine kinase receptors and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), to regulate the growth, development, survival and repair of the nervous system. These receptors can either collaborate with or inhibit each other’s actions to mediate neurotrophin effects. The development and survival of neurons is thus based upon the functional interplay of the signals generated by Trk and p75NTR. In the past two years, the signaling pathways used by these receptors, including Akt and MAPK-induced signaling via Trk, and JNK, p53, and NF-κB signaling via p75NTR, have been identified. In addition, a number of novel p75NTR-interacting proteins have been identified that transmit growth, survival, and apoptotic signals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Neurobiology Elsevier

Neurotrophin signal transduction in the nervous system

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0959-4388
DOI
10.1016/S0959-4388(00)00092-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Neurotrophins use two types of receptors, the Trk tyrosine kinase receptors and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), to regulate the growth, development, survival and repair of the nervous system. These receptors can either collaborate with or inhibit each other’s actions to mediate neurotrophin effects. The development and survival of neurons is thus based upon the functional interplay of the signals generated by Trk and p75NTR. In the past two years, the signaling pathways used by these receptors, including Akt and MAPK-induced signaling via Trk, and JNK, p53, and NF-κB signaling via p75NTR, have been identified. In addition, a number of novel p75NTR-interacting proteins have been identified that transmit growth, survival, and apoptotic signals.

Journal

Current Opinion in NeurobiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2000

References

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