Neuronal death in glaucoma

Neuronal death in glaucoma Glaucoma is recognized to have its major detrimental effect upon the eye by killing retinal ganglion cells. The process of cell death appears to be initiated at the optic nerve head, though other sites of injury are possible but unsubstantiated. At present the injury at the nerve head seems related to the level of the eye pressure, but its detailed mechanism is as yet unexplained. There is a greater loss of ganglion cells from some areas of the eye, and this feature of glaucoma seems related to the regional structure of the supporting connective tissues of the optic nerve head. Larger retinal ganglion cells have been consistently shown to have somewhat greater susceptibility to injury in glaucoma, though all cells are injured, even early in the process. Ganglion cells die by apoptosis in human and experimental glaucoma, opening several potential areas for future therapies to protect them from dying. Neurotrophin deprivation is one possible cause of cell death and replacement therapy is a potential approach to treatment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Retinal and Eye Research Elsevier

Neuronal death in glaucoma

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
1350-9462
eISSN
1873-1635
D.O.I.
10.1016/S1350-9462(98)00014-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Glaucoma is recognized to have its major detrimental effect upon the eye by killing retinal ganglion cells. The process of cell death appears to be initiated at the optic nerve head, though other sites of injury are possible but unsubstantiated. At present the injury at the nerve head seems related to the level of the eye pressure, but its detailed mechanism is as yet unexplained. There is a greater loss of ganglion cells from some areas of the eye, and this feature of glaucoma seems related to the regional structure of the supporting connective tissues of the optic nerve head. Larger retinal ganglion cells have been consistently shown to have somewhat greater susceptibility to injury in glaucoma, though all cells are injured, even early in the process. Ganglion cells die by apoptosis in human and experimental glaucoma, opening several potential areas for future therapies to protect them from dying. Neurotrophin deprivation is one possible cause of cell death and replacement therapy is a potential approach to treatment.

Journal

Progress in Retinal and Eye ResearchElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

  • Colour vision anomalies following experimental glaucoma in monkeys
    Kalloniatis, M.; Harwerth, R.S.; Smith, E.L.; DeSantis, L.
  • X and Y cells in the lateral geniculate nucleus of macaque monkeys
    Kaplan, E.; Shapley, R.M.
  • Open-angle glaucoma
    Quigley, H.A.
  • Temporal filter of the motion sensor in glaucoma
    Turano, K.A.; Huang, A.S.; Quigley, H.A.
  • Differential vulnerability of neurochemically identified subpopulations of retinal neurons in a monkey model of glaucoma
    Vickers, J.C.; Schumer, R.A.; Podos, S.M.; Wang, R.F.; Riederer, B.M.; Morrison, J.H.

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