Neogene palaeochannel deposits in Sudan – Remnants of a trans-Saharan river system?

Neogene palaeochannel deposits in Sudan – Remnants of a trans-Saharan river system? The start of Nile-type trans-Saharan drainage systems in NE Africa during the Cenozoic is disputed. Stratigraphical and sedimentological data in Egypt are partly in conflict with the uplift history of potential source areas of water and sediment in East Africa. Here, we investigate outcrops of the Wadi Awatib Conglomerate in Sudan that provide the first evidence of northerly flowing Neogene rivers in the region. Dimension and relief of basal erosion surfaces, overall geometry of deposits and palaeocurrent indicators demonstrate that the deposits represent the fill of northward-oriented incised valleys. The conglomerates were deposited in deep gravel-bed rivers, by hyperconcentrated flows, tractions carpets and gravel bars, primarily during heavily sediment-laden floods of probably monsoonal origin. Stratigraphical and geomorphological relationships show that the deposits are between Eocene and Pliocene in age. Considering the structural history of the region and periods in the Cenozoic with palaeoclimatic conditions suitable for the production and transport of gravels, we hypothesize that the dramatic base-level fall during the Late Miocene Messinian salinity crisis in combination with a favorable palaeoclimate caused the incision of valleys and their subsequent filling with conglomerates. Sea-level change in the Mediterranean Sea and headward erosion of streams that were connected to the Egyptian Nile might have been the primary cause of valley incision and deposition of conglomerates, despite a location far inland from the coastline. We suggest that the deposits document a relatively young Neogene (Messinian to early Pliocene) trans-Saharan river system unrelated to uplift of the Ethiopian Plateau. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Earth Sciences Elsevier

Neogene palaeochannel deposits in Sudan – Remnants of a trans-Saharan river system?

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/neogene-palaeochannel-deposits-in-sudan-remnants-of-a-trans-saharan-eNc1rLTj8l
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1464-343X
eISSN
1879-1956
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jafrearsci.2017.11.040
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The start of Nile-type trans-Saharan drainage systems in NE Africa during the Cenozoic is disputed. Stratigraphical and sedimentological data in Egypt are partly in conflict with the uplift history of potential source areas of water and sediment in East Africa. Here, we investigate outcrops of the Wadi Awatib Conglomerate in Sudan that provide the first evidence of northerly flowing Neogene rivers in the region. Dimension and relief of basal erosion surfaces, overall geometry of deposits and palaeocurrent indicators demonstrate that the deposits represent the fill of northward-oriented incised valleys. The conglomerates were deposited in deep gravel-bed rivers, by hyperconcentrated flows, tractions carpets and gravel bars, primarily during heavily sediment-laden floods of probably monsoonal origin. Stratigraphical and geomorphological relationships show that the deposits are between Eocene and Pliocene in age. Considering the structural history of the region and periods in the Cenozoic with palaeoclimatic conditions suitable for the production and transport of gravels, we hypothesize that the dramatic base-level fall during the Late Miocene Messinian salinity crisis in combination with a favorable palaeoclimate caused the incision of valleys and their subsequent filling with conglomerates. Sea-level change in the Mediterranean Sea and headward erosion of streams that were connected to the Egyptian Nile might have been the primary cause of valley incision and deposition of conglomerates, despite a location far inland from the coastline. We suggest that the deposits document a relatively young Neogene (Messinian to early Pliocene) trans-Saharan river system unrelated to uplift of the Ethiopian Plateau.

Journal

Journal of African Earth SciencesElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off