Negative consequences of corporal punishment of children are unequivocal

Negative consequences of corporal punishment of children are unequivocal www.jpeds.com THE EDITORS’ PERSPECTIVES March 2018 � Volume 194 Copyright © 2018 by Elsevier Inc. ultiple avenues of clinical research demonstrate that dating violence has nega- Negative M tive consequences. The causes of dating violence likely are multifactorial. Use consequences of of corporal punishment of children by parents seeking to correct or control behavior is commonly practiced. Temple et al, in this volume of The Journal, note that existing corporal punishment literature associates corporal punishment of children with negative childhood out- of children are comes (eg, increased aggression), but is confounded by inclusion of multiple types of maltreatment, including physical abuse of children. They sought to obtain more granu- unequivocal lar data about consequences of corporal punishment alone. In this study they sought — Sarah S. Long,MD to assess whether corporal punishment in childhood was associated with dating vio- lence in adolescence. The study population derived from 1042 students recruited at grades 9-10 from 7 urban and suburban public high schools in southeast Texas. The students were fol- lowed longitudinally, annually, to study adolescent risky behaviors. The current study was a cross-sectional analysis that included 758 participants who completed the follow up 5 years later (Wave 6), the first study Wave in which questions about prior corpo- ral punishment were included. A significant positive association between corporal pun- ishment and perpetration of dating violence was found, with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.07 and 1.59). In multivariate analysis controlling for broad potentially confound- ing variables, corporal punishment remained a significant predictor of perpetration of dating violence. Another noteworthy finding in the study, consistent with existing studies, was that females were more likely than male counterparts to perpetrate teen dating violence. The authors posit that although society can continue to argue about the use of cor- poral punishment, its negative consequences are unequivocal, and outweigh any pos- sible benefits. Article page 233 ▶ any treatments in pediatrics beyond chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered Fertile ground for M to oncology patients affect future fertility. Steroids, psychiatric medications, education on fertility antiepileptic drugs, thyroid medications, novel biologic agents, and illicit drugs can affect fertility in the short- and long-term. In addition, many drugs used in oncology, such preservation as cyclophosphamide, are deployed now in other subspecialties. Some disorders also — Paul G. Fisher,MD have intrinsic risks of infertility. In this volume of The Journal, Vakeesan et al report the results of a pilot needs as- sessment exploring knowledge and practice regarding fertility preservation among non- oncology pediatric subspecialists. Although the investigators explored only a small sample of physicians from a single institution, the results were clear. Despite some recogni- tion by providers that patients are at risk for future sterility, fertility preservation is rarely considered or used among patients with non-oncologic diagnoses when conditions place them at risk either from treatment or the underlying diagnosis. Further attention to understanding future risks of infertility in pediatric patients and increasing fertility pres- ervation are warranted. Article page 253 ▶ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Pediatrics Elsevier

Negative consequences of corporal punishment of children are unequivocal

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0022-3476
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10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.01.002
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Abstract

www.jpeds.com THE EDITORS’ PERSPECTIVES March 2018 � Volume 194 Copyright © 2018 by Elsevier Inc. ultiple avenues of clinical research demonstrate that dating violence has nega- Negative M tive consequences. The causes of dating violence likely are multifactorial. Use consequences of of corporal punishment of children by parents seeking to correct or control behavior is commonly practiced. Temple et al, in this volume of The Journal, note that existing corporal punishment literature associates corporal punishment of children with negative childhood out- of children are comes (eg, increased aggression), but is confounded by inclusion of multiple types of maltreatment, including physical abuse of children. They sought to obtain more granu- unequivocal lar data about consequences of corporal punishment alone. In this study they sought — Sarah S. Long,MD to assess whether corporal punishment in childhood was associated with dating vio- lence in adolescence. The study population derived from 1042 students recruited at grades 9-10 from 7 urban and suburban public high schools in southeast Texas. The students were fol- lowed longitudinally, annually, to study adolescent risky behaviors. The current study was a cross-sectional analysis that included 758 participants who completed the follow up 5 years later (Wave 6), the first study Wave in which questions about prior corpo- ral punishment were included. A significant positive association between corporal pun- ishment and perpetration of dating violence was found, with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.07 and 1.59). In multivariate analysis controlling for broad potentially confound- ing variables, corporal punishment remained a significant predictor of perpetration of dating violence. Another noteworthy finding in the study, consistent with existing studies, was that females were more likely than male counterparts to perpetrate teen dating violence. The authors posit that although society can continue to argue about the use of cor- poral punishment, its negative consequences are unequivocal, and outweigh any pos- sible benefits. Article page 233 ▶ any treatments in pediatrics beyond chemotherapy and radiotherapy delivered Fertile ground for M to oncology patients affect future fertility. Steroids, psychiatric medications, education on fertility antiepileptic drugs, thyroid medications, novel biologic agents, and illicit drugs can affect fertility in the short- and long-term. In addition, many drugs used in oncology, such preservation as cyclophosphamide, are deployed now in other subspecialties. Some disorders also — Paul G. Fisher,MD have intrinsic risks of infertility. In this volume of The Journal, Vakeesan et al report the results of a pilot needs as- sessment exploring knowledge and practice regarding fertility preservation among non- oncology pediatric subspecialists. Although the investigators explored only a small sample of physicians from a single institution, the results were clear. Despite some recogni- tion by providers that patients are at risk for future sterility, fertility preservation is rarely considered or used among patients with non-oncologic diagnoses when conditions place them at risk either from treatment or the underlying diagnosis. Further attention to understanding future risks of infertility in pediatric patients and increasing fertility pres- ervation are warranted. Article page 253 ▶

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The Journal of PediatricsElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 2018

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