Multiscale assessment of structured coated abrasive grits in belt finishing process

Multiscale assessment of structured coated abrasive grits in belt finishing process This paper outlines the link between grit morphology and surface roughness of belt-finished workpieces. It features a comparative analysis of a new generation of abrasive belts with diverse abrasive structures, and a multi-scale roughness characterization of abrasive belt wear on a variety of finished surfaces. The ultimate thickness of the mechanically deformed layer and surface profile projections depends, to a great extent, on the abrasive mechanisms of friction and wear employed in the finishing process. By modifying the physical mechanisms (cutting, plowing or sliding), it is possible to achieve a concomitant change in the rate of material removal and, consequently, to the specific surface roughness of the finished parts.Our research shows that the active roughness scale resulting from belt finishing is strongly dependent on the grit orientation and the binder distribution. The results are promising for increasing the efficiency of the abrasion processes and for improving the surface texturing of finished parts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wear Elsevier

Multiscale assessment of structured coated abrasive grits in belt finishing process

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0043-1648
eISSN
1873-2577
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.wear.2015.01.054
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper outlines the link between grit morphology and surface roughness of belt-finished workpieces. It features a comparative analysis of a new generation of abrasive belts with diverse abrasive structures, and a multi-scale roughness characterization of abrasive belt wear on a variety of finished surfaces. The ultimate thickness of the mechanically deformed layer and surface profile projections depends, to a great extent, on the abrasive mechanisms of friction and wear employed in the finishing process. By modifying the physical mechanisms (cutting, plowing or sliding), it is possible to achieve a concomitant change in the rate of material removal and, consequently, to the specific surface roughness of the finished parts.Our research shows that the active roughness scale resulting from belt finishing is strongly dependent on the grit orientation and the binder distribution. The results are promising for increasing the efficiency of the abrasion processes and for improving the surface texturing of finished parts.

Journal

WearElsevier

Published: May 1, 2015

References

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